Ethnomusicology News

Timothy Mangin Appointed Assistant Professor of Music at Boston College

The Department of Music warmly congratulates Ethnomusicology PhD Alumnus Dr. Timothy Mangin, who has been appointed Assistant Professor of Music at Boston College. Timothy Mangin completed his PhD in Ethnomusicology at Columbia in 2013. Prof. Mangin is an ethnomusicologist and musician researching the intersection of popular music, race, ethnicity, religion, and cosmopolitanism in West Africa and the African Diaspora. He has received fellowships from the Columbia University’s Center for Comparative Literature and Society, St. Lawrence University’s Department of Music, Mellon Foundation, the Foreign Language Areas Studies Program and a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Research Abroad Program. He taught at Columbia University, New York University, St. Lawrence University, and the City University of New York. An improvisational flutist, Tim founded St. Lawrence University’s Jazz and Improv Ensemble and also studies mbira and is a member of Capoeira Brasil. His writings have appeared in the edited volumes Begegnungen: The World Meets Jazz and Uptown Conversations: The New Jazz Studies as well as reviews in The Yearbook for Traditional Music and Ethnomusicology On-Line. Tim is working on a book examining indigenous cosmopolitanism through the intersection of the Senegalese urban dance music called mbalax and the practice of black, Wolof (the dominant ethnic group), gendered, and Muslim identities. He is also exploring blackness in Senegalese hip hop and the dynamics of improvisation in New York City’s underground hip hop and jazz scene. The Digital Humanities is a key part of Tim’s pedagogy and research that began when he worked at Columbia’s Institute for Research in African American Studies on the Malcolm X Project, under the direction Manning Marable, and further developed with students at The City College of New York. Dr. Mangin's Columbia PhD dissertation, on Senegalese mbalax, was advised by Prof. George Lewis.

Lauren Flood Appointed Post-Doctoral Fellow at MIT

The Department of Music warmly congratulates PhD alumna Dr. Lauren Flood, who has been appointed as a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Lauren Flood earned the Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology from Columbia in 2015. She researches sound technologies and experimental instrument building practices in the contexts of the do-it-yourself ethos, maker culture, and popular and experimental music scenes. She held a Whiting Fellowship for her dissertation, “Building and Becoming: DIY Music Technology in New York and Berlin,” with fieldwork supported by the Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies and the National Science Foundation. Lauren’s work is situated at the nexus of music, anthropology, sound studies, and science and technology studies. She engages with dialogs on critical organology, creativity and knowledge production, histories and aesthetics of sound and recording practices, vernacular technologies and everydayness, ethics and labor in the music industry, alternative methods in science and technology education, and the contemporary sense of self as mediated through the arts.

At Columbia, she has been a teaching fellow in Music Humanities and Asian Music Humanities, the graduate assistant for the Center for Ethnomusicology, an editorial board member and reviews editor for Current Musicology, and on the organizing committee of the Columbia Music Scholarship Conference. She has presented her work at annual meetings of the Society for Ethnomusicology, the American Anthropological Association, the Society for the Social Studies of Science, and the EMP Pop Conference.

Prior to her graduate studies, Lauren completed her undergraduate degree at Drexel University, with a major in music industry and a minor in anthropology. While living in Philadelphia, she studied and performed as a guitarist, worked in copyrights and licensing, and assisted with research at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. She also completed field schools in Latin American ethnomusicology and archaeology, maintaining a long-standing interest in Mesoamerica and the modern Mayan region.

Dr. Flood's Columbia PhD dissertation was advised by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa.

Jenny Payne Awarded Luce Scholarship

Congratulations to Jenny Payne (BC 2016), a neuroscience and ethnomusicology major, for being awarded the prestigious Luce Scholarship! The Luce Scholars Program provides professional placement, in addition to language study and stipends, in Asia for American college seniors, graduate students, and young professionals. The program's goal is to "enhance the understanding of Asia among potential leaders in American society." Jenny gave an interview to the Columbia Spectator, in which she outlines her personal and professional journey and goals: read it here.

Columbia Music Scholarship Conference (Saturday, February 27)

Columbia Music Scholarship Conference (CMSC) 2016

The eleventh annual Columbia Music Scholarship Conference (CMSC) will be held at Columbia University on Saturday, February 27, 2016.

CMSC is a conference organized and staffed by the graduate students of the Department of Music at Columbia University.

Keynote Speaker
Professor Alexander Rehding (Harvard University)

"Piano, Monochord, Siren: Studying Music 1999 – 1518 – 1834"

Full details at the conference website!

Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa Wins 2015 Merriam Book Prize from Society for Ethnomusicology!

The Department warmly congratulates Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa (Ethnomusicology), whose new book Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth Century Colombia (Duke University Press, 2014) has been co-awarded the prestigious Alan Merriam Prize from the Society for Ethnomusicology.

The Merriam Prize recognizes "the most distinguished, published English-language monograph in the field of ethnomusicology" of the prior two year period.

Position Announcement: Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowships in Music

The Department of Music at Columbia University invites applications for (two) Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowships.

Appointment will be at the rank of Mellon Teaching Fellow/Lecturer, for a period of two years to begin July 1, 2016.

A PhD, DMA or the equivalent is required. The degree must have been received between January 1, 2012 and July 1, 2016. Fellows will be expected to do research, participate in the academic life of the Department of Music, and teach one course per semester in each of the two years(three in Columbia's Core Curriculum and one in the candidate's area of specialization).

Review of applications begins January 19, 2016 and will continue until the positions are filled.

Please visit the following link (Columbia University RAPS) for detailed information and to apply:

https://academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=61975

Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer -- Race/Gender/Disability/Veteran.

Columbia Music Scholarship Conference: Call for Papers (Deadline Jan 5 2016)

The Columbia Music Scholarship Conference invites graduate students and recent Ph.D. recipients to submit abstracts to be selected for presentation at our eleventh annual meeting on February 27, 2016 at Columbia University in New York. The theme of the 2016 meeting will be Listening. We are pleased to announce that the conference will feature a keynote address by Alexander Rehding (Harvard University).

CFP Deadline: January 5, 2016.

We seek papers that engage with topics including, but not limited to, the following:

--Mediated Listening: How have technologies shaped listening practices and how have practices of listening shaped technologies?
--Sound: Toxic or Curative?: How have medical, physiological, and psychological discoveries affected the way listening is understood? How have practitioners in these fields studied listening and hearing?
--(In)Active Listening: How might states of mind affect listening? How does space influence listening practice and musical performance?
--Listening In: How can listening be used as a mode of surveillance and control? How does ethics factor into listening?
--Constructed Listeners: Who are the assumed listeners in music scholarship? Whose identities are excluded? How are these exclusions perpetuated by different types of music, sound, or noise?
--Pedagogy: In what ways have educational institutions impacted the practices of listening? How do pedagogical approaches “cultivate” listeners?

We are soliciting proposals for twenty-minute presentations from scholars active in all music disciplines as well as from scholars in related fields, aiming to maximize the theoretical and methodological breadth of the discussion.

Please submit abstracts of 200 to 250 words to 2016cmsc [at] gmail.com by January 5, 2016. Please include your name and contact information in your e-mail only, and attach the abstract as a Word, text, or .pdf file. The committee will select papers anonymously. All scholars who submit abstracts will be notified of the committee's decision by January 20th. For more information on the conference, please visit the conference website.

Ana María Ochoa at CENIDIM for the Cátedra Jesús C. Romero 2015

Professor Ana María Ochoa delivered four public lectures from November 2 to November 6 for the Cátedra Jesús C. Romero 2015 in Mexico's CENIDIM (Centro Nacional de Investigación, Documentación e Información Musical "Carlos Chávez"). The lecture series was entitled "Figuraciones de lo sonoro en América Latina y el Caribe." More information can be found here.

Kevin Holt Wins Ford Predoctoral Fellowship

Congratulations to Columbia ethnomusicology PhD student Kevin Holt, who has been awarded a 2013 Predoctoral Fellowship from the Ford Foundation. This fellowship, which provides three years of full support for doctoral research, is sponsored by the Ford Foundation and administered by the National Research Council of the National Academies. Mr. Holt's selection for this prestigious award reflects Ford Foundation's panelists’ "judgment of scholarly competence as well as the promise of future achievement as a scholar, researcher, and teacher."

Center for Ethnomusicology Announces Hopi Music Repatriation Project

The Center for Ethnomusicology holds copies of, and rights to, the Laura Boulton Collection of Traditional Music, consisting of field recordings of folk and traditional musics made around the world by collector Laura Boulton, from the 1930s through the 1960s. In 1933 and again in 1940, Boulton recorded a total of 129 Hopi songs, ranging from secular to spiritual genres. (The 1933 recordings were made at the Chicago Century of Progress Exposition; the 1940 recordings at Hopi.)

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