Music as Law -- Veit Erlmann

Veit Erlmann
Music as Law: "The Lion King," Intellectual Property, and South African Cultural Heritage

Location:  The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Tuesday, February 2, 5:30pm
Part of The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University's colloquium series!
For more information click here!

The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University is proud to announce this year's colloquium series!


The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University is proud to announce this year's colloquium series!

Veit Erlmann
Music as Law: "The Lion King," Intellectual Property, and South African Cultural Heritage

Location:  The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Tuesday, February 2, 5:30pm

Martin A. Mills
Chanting, Mantras, and the Presence of Divinity in Tibetan Buddhist Ritual

Co-sponsored by the East Asian Languages and Cultures Department
Location: EALAC Lounge Room 403 Kent Hall
Monday, March 1, 5:00pm

Amanda Weidman
Female Voices in the Public Sphere:  Playback Singing as Cultural Phenomenon in South India

Location:  The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Tuesday, March 9, 5:30pm

Kiri Miller
How Musical Is Guitar Hero?

Location:  The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Tuesday, March 30, 5:30pm

Amanda Minks
Postcolonial Play: Socializing Race and Language on the Carribean Coast of Nicaragua

Featured Undergraduate Courses, SPRING 2010

Click here for full size poster

 

 

 

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Featured Undergraduate Courses for Spring 2009-10


Full size poster




Department of Music, Columbia University
Featured Undergraduate Courses for Spring 2009-10
 
(click image to enlarge flyer)

 

Full size poster




Department of Music, Columbia University
Featured Undergraduate Courses for Spring 2009-10
 
(click image to enlarge flyer)


Tyler Bickford Wins Lise Waxler and Panteleoni Prizes

Tyler Bickford's Website

Congratulations to Tyler Bickford, a PhD candidate in ethnomusicology at Columbia, who has just been awarded two prestigious prizes for recent conference papers:

1) The 2009 Lise Waxer Prize from the Popular Music Section of the Society for Ethnomusicology, recognizing the most distinguished student paper in the ethnomusicology of popular music presented at the SEM annual meeting in Wesleyan, CT, October 2008, for his paper entitled: "Media Consumption as Social Organization at a New England Primary School."

and

2) The 2009 Hewitt Pantaleoni Prize from the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Society for Ethnomusicology (MACSEM) for the best student paper presented at the Middle Atlantic SEM Chapter meeting in New York, March 2008, entitled: "The Social Economy of Headphone Use in a New England Primary School."

Learn more about Tyler Bickford's work at his personal website.

Tyler Bickford's Website

Congratulations to Tyler Bickford, a PhD candidate in ethnomusicology at Columbia, who has just been awarded two prestigious prizes for recent conference papers:

1) The 2009 Lise Waxer Prize from the Popular Music Section of the Society for Ethnomusicology, recognizing the most distinguished student paper in the ethnomusicology of popular music presented at the SEM annual meeting in Wesleyan, CT, October 2008, for his paper entitled: "Media Consumption as Social Organization at a New England Primary School."

and

2) The 2009 Hewitt Pantaleoni Prize from the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Society for Ethnomusicology (MACSEM) for the best student paper presented at the Middle Atlantic SEM Chapter meeting in New York, March 2008, entitled: "The Social Economy of Headphone Use in a New England Primary School."

Learn more about Tyler Bickford's work at his personal website.

Prof. George Lewis Wins Music in American Culture Award from AMS

A Power Stronger Than Itself -- George Lewis



We congratulate George Lewis, the Edwin Case Professor of American Music, whose 2008 book A Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM and American Experimental Music (Univ. of Chicago Press) has been awarded the "Music in American Culture" prize for "outstanding scholarship in the music of the United States" by the American Musicological Society, at the AMS 2009 annual meeting in Philadelphia.

A Power Stronger Than Itself was also recently awarded The American Book Award by the Before Columbus Foundation.

 

Center for Ethnomusicology Announces Hopi Music Repatriation Project

Hopi Tribal FlagThe Center for Ethnomusicology

holds copies of, and rights to, the Laura Boulton Collection of Traditional Music, consisting of field recordings of folk and traditional musics made around the world by collector Laura Boulton, from the 1930s through the 1960s.  In 1933 and again in 1940, Boulton recorded a total of 129 Hopi songs, ranging from secular to spiritual genres.  (The 1933 recordings were made at the Chicago Century of Progress Exposition; the 1940 recordings at Hopi.)

Hopi Tribal FlagThe Center for Ethnomusicology

Alaska Repatriation Project Featured on Polar Field Services Website

 Tagiugmiut Dancers, Barrow, June 2008 (photo A. Fox)

The Center for Ethnomusicology's NSF-funded project to repatriate Laura Boulton's 1946 Alaskan Iñupiat recordings, led by Prof. Aaron Fox and Postdoctoral Fellow Chie Sakakibara,  has recently been featured in an article on the Polar Field Services' Notes blog. Read the article here.


Aaron and Chie will be in Alaska from Nov. 20-29.


Sonia Seeman: Metaphoricity, Iconicity and Mimesis in Turkish Roma (Gypsy) Music

Sonia Seeman talk

The Center for Ethnomusicology is pleased to present a public colloquium featuring  Sonia Seeman (Assistant Professor, Department of Music, University of Texas at Austin), entitled:

Metaphoricity, Iconicity and Mimesis: Towards a Musical Semantics of Social Identity in Turkish Roman (“Gypsy”) Music

The colloquium will be held from 4-6PM on Tuesday, November 6, 2009, in 701C Dodge.  It is free and open to the public. For more information, please click here.

Graduate Students Meeting

Friday, October 30, 11am to noon, 622 Dodge

Meeting of Music Department Graduate Students, with faculty, to discuss the Arts & Sciences Academic Review of the Department taking place this year. The Academic Review takes place once every ten years (the last was in 1999) and involves a departmental self-study, visits by external reviewers, and a final assessment by the Academic Review Committee of Arts & Sciences. The graduate program is an important component of this review, and input from graduate students in all areas is essential. Please come to this meeting to share ideas, thoughts, concerns. Refreshments will be served.

Walter Frisch, DGS Music