Jiang, Qingfan

Name: 
Qingfan Jiang
Position: 
PhD Student in Historical Musicology
Contact Information
Email Address: 
qj2129@columbia.edu

Qingfan Jiang came to the United States at the age of fifteen to study piano at Interlochen Arts Academy. She has earned her Bachelor's degree in Music Composition from Illinois Wesleyan University and her Master's in Musicology from Rice. She is currently a PhD student at Columbia. Her research focuses on the revival of early music in late nineteenth-century France. 

 

Ivanova, Velia

Name: 
Velia Ivanova
Position: 
PhD Student in Historical Musicology
Administrative Roles: 
Contact Information
Email Address: 
vi2126@columbia.edu

Velia Ivanova is a PhD student in Historical Musicology with research interests focused on critical theory, aesthetics, and twentieth century music. She holds a Bachelor of Music and a Master of Arts in Musicology from the University of Ottawa, where her thesis "Twelve-Tone Identity: Adorno Reading Schoenberg through Kant" sought to compare Adorno's commentaries on Schoenberg and Kant and to relate this comparison to a critique of the transactional nature of the production and reception of ideas. In the past, her research has been supported by the Joseph Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship and the Ontario Graduate Scholarship. 

 

Hamilton, Julia

Name: 
Julia Hamilton
Position: 
PhD Student in Historical Musicology
Contact Information
Email Address: 
jmh2273@columbia.edu

Julia Hamilton spent the 2013-14 academic year on a Fulbright grant, studying for an MA in Eighteenth-Century Studies at the University of Southampton. She wrote her dissertation on 'Pamela' operas on the 1760s London stage. Prior to this, she received a BA in Music and English from the College of the Holy Cross. Outside of studying, Julia enjoys singing, acting, and playing cello. 

 

Frühauf, Tina

Name: 
Tina Frühauf
Position: 
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music
Contact Information
Office Address: 
621 Dodge Hall
Email Address: 
tf2213@columbia.edu
Educated in Germany, Dr. Fruhauf specializes in the history of Jewish music in Western Europe. She is the author of The Organ and Its Music in German-Jewish Culture (Oxford University Press, 2009/2012), and editor of An Anthology of German-Jewish Organ Music (A-R Editions, 2013, nominated for the Claude V. Palisca Award for Outstanding Edition), Hans Samuel: Selected Piano Works (A-R Editions, 2013), and Dislocated Memories: Jews, Music, and Postwar German Culture (OUP, 2014). Supported by grants from the Leo Baeck Institute and Memorial Foundation of Jewish Culture, Dr. Fruhauf is currently completing a monograph on music in the Jewish communities of Germany after 1945.
 

Parkhurst, Bryan

Name: 
Bryan Parkhurst
Position: 
Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Music, 2014-16
Contact Information
Email Address: 
bjp2146@columbia.edu

Dr. Bryan Parkhurst came to Columbia as a Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Music in 2014. He earned his PhD in philosophy and music theory from the University of Michigan, where he was supported by both a Regents Fellowship and a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship.  His dissertation, "Sound's Arguments: Philosophical Encounters with Music Theory," which was written under the supervision of Kendall Walton, Ramon Satyendra, and Kevin Korsyn, engages closely with the thought of such figures as Schenker, Lewin, Kant, Hegel, Hanslick, Schopenhauer, Dewey, and Wittgenstein.   He is currently researching a book about Hegel and Hauptmann.  Additionally, Bryan is interested in Marxist philosophy generally and Marxist aesthetics in particular, as well as in the grand question of whether and how it is possible for music to be philosophy (Marxist or otherwise).  Bryan's recent publications appear in Music Theory Online, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, The Journal of Interdisciplinary Humanities, and elsewhere.  He is a also a harpist and accordionist. 

Field Methods & Techniques in Ethnomusicology for Undergrads (MUSI G4401, Fall 2014)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Field Methods and Techniques in Ethnomusicology
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G4401
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Aaron Fox (Fall 2014)

Fall 2014 
Music G4401
ETHNOMUSICOLOGICAL FIELD METHODS/TECHNIQUES (for undergraduates!)
Section 001 Call Number: 62038 Points: 3
Day/Time: T 4:10pm-6:00pm
Location: To be announced

Instructor: Prof. Aaron A. Fox (bio)

The goals of this course are practice-oriented. The end result will be short fieldwork-based project of approxiamtely 20 pages in length. In order to complete the paper, students will conduct fieldwork, read and synthesize relevant literatures, and think carefully about the questions in which they are interested and methods of addressing them through ethnographic inquiry.

This course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students in the junior or senior year only.  Permission of the instructor is required. Class size is limited to 12 students, with priority given to Barnard College Ethnomusicology majors and other Music major/concentrators.  Please contact Prof. Fox as soon as possible if you intend to register for this course. 

Music and Politics in Pre-Revolutionary France (MUSI W4150, NEW for Fall 2014!)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Music and Politics in Pre-Revolutionary France
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4150
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Julia Doe

Fall 2014
Music MUSI W4150

MUSIC & POLITICS IN PRE-REVOLUTIONARY FRANCE (New for 2014!)
Section 001 Call Number: 27746 Points: 3 
Day/Time: MW 10:10am-11:25am
Location: 701a Dodge Hall
Instructor: Julia Doe (bio)

This course examines the relationship between musical and political institutions in France, from the reign of Louis XIV through the fall of the monarchy. We will 1) survey the development of musical style through listening and analysis; and 2) investigate how representative works reflected broad changes in the production and consumption of music during the grand siecle and age of Enlightenment. Topics will include: systems of court patronage and theatrical privilege; the rise of music criticism in the public sphere; the influence of the philosophes; salon culture; and the role of the arts in the historiography of the Revolution.

Listening to Hip-Hop

Course Information

Course Title: 
Listening to Hip-Hop
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V3395
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ellie Hisama

Fall 2014 Music V3395
LISTENING TO HIP-HOP

Section 001
Call Number: 24116 Points: 3 
Day/Time: MW 2:40pm-3:55pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Ellie Hisama

An interdisciplinary exploration of hip-hop music and culture from its beginnings to the present through historical, analytical, and critical perspectives. The course's primary focus will be on critical listening. Readings will help to situate particular pieces of music, artists, and genres within their cultural, political, and social contexts. Using through historical, analytical, and critical perspectives, we will examine hip-hop's complex relationships to politics, race, gender, sexuality, class, region, and diaspora as evident in performances, recordings, videos, films, and popular culture.

20th Century Music (MUSI V3172, Fall 2014)

Course Information

Course Title: 
20th Century Music
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V3172
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. George Lewis

Fall 2014
Music V3172
20TH CENTURY MUSIC
Section 001
Call Number: 65591 Points: 3 
Day/Time: MW 10:10am-11:25am
Location: To be announced
Instructor: George Lewis (bio)

A multicultural survey of composers, improvisers, sounds, practices and social issues in the music of "the long 20th century." Engages form, technique, genre, style, canon, media reception, constructions of gender and race, cultural nationalisms, and the impact of transnationalism and globalization. Reading knowledge of music is very helpful but not required.