Prof. Mariusz Kozak's Research Featured in Columbia News!

Prof. Mariusz Kozak, who recently joined Columbia's faculty in Music Theory, is the subject of a new article in Columbia News discussing his research. Author Gary Shapiro writes . . . 

"Kozak, who joined Columbia's Department of Music last July, is now taking that research interest a step further, studying the connection between how people listen and move to music. "Every known culture has some sort of combination of dance and music." Whether you're tapping your feet to jazz, nodding along to classical music or playing air guitar to rock 'n' roll, it is all material for his research. "The study of motion and music is an emerging area," said Kozak, who notes that interest in the subject has risen over the past decade or so as the technology for recording the movement of objects and people--motion capture--has improved."


Read more here!

 

Music Theory PhD student Orit Hilewicz Wins Founders Prize from International Society for the Study of Time (ISST)!

The Department congratulates Music Theory PhD Candidate Orit Hilewicz, who has received the Founders Prize for New Scholars at the triennial conference of the International Society for the Study of Time (ISST) for her paper "Tracing Space in Time: Morton Feldman's Rothko Chapel." 

The prize announcement may be read online here.

Ms. Hilewicz's paper explores the relationship between Rothko's chapel in Houston, TX, and Morton Feldman's 1971 composition titled Rothko Chapel, composed for the chapel space. Focusing on the temporal dimension of Feldman's work, she examines the piece as a case of musical ekphrasis, the musical representation of another artwork, and shows that the interaction between contrasting musical temporalities in Feldman's Rothko Chapel becomes a temporal trace of a visitor's experience in Rothko's chapel. This paper is part of a larger analysis project that explores points of intersection between music and the visual arts, studying ekphrastic musical works as text for the original works they represent. 

Columbia Welcomes Professor Mariusz Kozak!

 

The Department of Music is delighted to welcome Mariusz Kozak to our faculty in Music Theory.  Prof. Kozak will join Columbia University as an Assistant Professor of Music in July, 2013.  He is currently a post-doctoral scholar and visiting assistant professor of music theory at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music.  His research focuses on the emergence of musical meaning in contemporary art music, the development and cognitive bases of musical experience, and the phenomenology of bodily interactions in musical behavior. In his work, he attempts to bridge experimental approaches from embodied cognition with phenomenology and music analysis, in particular using motion-capture technology to study the movements of performers and listeners. His current project examines how listeners' understanding and experience of musical time are shaped by bodily actions and gestures.

 
As a violinist, Kozak has performed with the Rochester Philharmonic, the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra, the Santa Fe Opera, and the Santa Fe Symphony. After a stint with a Chicago-based country band, he continues to fiddle around in his spare time.
 

Announcing a New MFA Program in Sound Arts at Columbia!

New Program Announcement!

SOUND ARTS

A new Interdepartmental MFA Program offered by the Columbia University School of the Arts in association with the Department of Music and the Computer Music Center.

Applications for Fall 2013 Now Being Accepted (Deadline Feb. 20, 2013)
 
Columbia University has been at the helm of sound-technology innovation for over fifty years with faculty specializing in composition, improvisation, sound installation, computer music, digital sound synthesis, acoustics, music cognition and software development.  Columbia's Computer Music Center in the Department of Music has a long history of creative excellence; its primary mission is to operate at the intersection of musical expression and technological development. The Center has state-of-the-art facilities for working in electro-acoustic music.  Faculty of the Center for Computer Music led the development of the new interdisciplinary area in Sound Arts that leads to the Master of Fine Arts degree awarded by the School of the Arts.

 
The Sound Arts area is currently accepting applications for Fall 2013. The program is highly selective. Each year only three to four students will be offered admission to the two-year program. Prospective students with a deep engagement with sound as medium, a familiarity with contemporary audio tools and techniques, and a demonstrated use of those tools in different contexts (sculptural or video installations, creation of performance interfaces, circuit-bending productions, innovative fusion of digital audio with digital graphics, imaginative use of network technologies) are encouraged to apply. While the Visual Arts Program in the School of the Arts currently accommodates students working in digital media, sculpture, installation, performance, film and video art, applicants who wish to base their research and studio practice primarily in the area of sonic or sound arts are to apply to the area of Sound Arts.