Prof. Ellie Hisama Wins Curriculum Development Grant from IRWGS

The Department of Music congratulates Professor Ellie Hisama, who was awarded an inaugural curriculum development grant from Columbia's Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Funded by the Mellon Foundation and the Heyman Center, the grant supports development of a new course titled "Feminist Listening: Critical and Intersectional Approaches to Popular Music," which Prof. Hisama expects to offer in 2015 or 2016.   

Columbia Theorists Triumph at the SMT Annual Meeting

At the Annual Meeting of the Society for Music Theory in Milwaukee (November 2014), held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the American Musicological Society, the faculty, alumni, and affiliates of the Music Theory area garnered major awards, presented papers, and chaired panels.

The Emerging Scholar Award (for a book or article published no more than seven calendar years after the author's receipt of the Ph.D.) was awarded to Benjamin Steege (Assistant Professor), Helmholtz and the Modern Listener  (Cambridge University Press).
 
The Wallace Berry Award (for a distinguished book by an author of any age or career stage) was awarded to Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis (University of Arkansas; PhD 2003), On Repeat: How Music Plays the Mind  (Oxford University Press).

The Outstanding Publication Award (for a distinguished article by an author of any age or career stage) was awarded to Nathan Martin (Yale University; Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow 2009-11), "Rameau's Changing Views on Supposition and Suspension," Journal of Music Theory.

Eamonn Bell (doctoral student in Theory) participated in the poster session "Empirical Approaches to Music Theory and Musicology" (a joint session with the American Musicological Society).

Maeve Sterbenz (doctoral student in Theory) read "Listening through Movement: An Examination of Lar Lubovitch's Choreography of the Adagio from Mozart's Clarinet Concerto in A Major, K. 622" on "Dancing Undisciplined" (AMS Music and Dance Study Group).

Dr. Bryan Parkhurst Appointed Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Music!

The Department of Music is delighted to welcome Dr. Bryan Parkhurst as an incoming Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow for 2014-16!

Dr. Parkhurst earned his PhD in philosophy and music theory from the University of Michigan, where he was supported by both a Regents Fellowship and a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship.  His dissertation, "Sound's Arguments: Philosophical Encounters with Music Theory," which was written under the supervision of Kendall Walton, Ramon Satyendra, and Kevin Korsyn, engages closely with the thought of such figures as Schenker, Lewin, Kant, Hegel, Hanslick, Schopenhauer, Dewey, and Wittgenstein.   He is currently researching a book about Hegel and Hauptmann.  Additionally, Bryan is interested in Marxist philosophy generally and Marxist aesthetics in particular, as well as in the grand question of whether and how it is possible for music to be philosophy (Marxist or otherwise).  Bryan's recent publications appear in Music Theory Online, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, The Journal of Interdisciplinary Humanities, and elsewhere.  He is a also a harpist and accordionist. 

Graduating Seniors Olivia Munson, Josh Owens, & Alexander Porter Win Departmental Honors!

The Department of Music is pleased to announce that Departmental Honors for 2014 are awarded to the following graduating senior music majors:

Alexander Porter (Columbia College) for his project (advised by Prof. Joseph Dubiel), "Of Diagrammatology in Music and Architecture," which included both an extended essay and two original creative works, a composition called "Diachronism" and a short play called "Broken Images."  All were woven together by Alex's stimulating, imaginative exploration of time, memory, and space across both musical and architectural dimensions. A complete PDF version of Alexander's thesis can be downloaded here.

Olivia Munson (Columbia College) for her essay (advised by Prof. Aaron Fox) "A Space for Musical Therapy: On Nationalism, Modernity, Music, and Medicine in the Transition from Ottoman Empire to Turkish Republic."  This essay looks at the use of music for medicinal or therapeutic purposes across broad historical span of Turkish history.  Olivia's essay represents an impressive combination of on-the-ground fieldwork and sophisticated theoretical-historical analysis.

Congratulations to our 2014 Doctoral Graduates!

Photos: Smiles at the GSAS doctoral convocation on Sunday, May 18, 2014 and at the department's luncheon on Wednesday, May 21 after Commencement.

We congratulate our new doctoral alumni!

Graduate School of Arts & Sciences  PhD/DMA:

Dr. Toby King Appointed Assistant Professor of Music at UNC Asheville!

The Department of Music warmly congratulates Jonathan "Toby" King (PhD, Ethnomusicology, 2014), who has been appointed Assistant Professor of Music at The University of North Carolina at Asheville!  Mr. King's dissertation is entitled "Implications of Contemporary Bluegrass Music Performance at and around a New York City Jam Session," and it is sponsored by Prof. Aaron Fox. Dr. King defended his dissertation on June 2, 2014. 

Dr. Kate Heidemann Appointed Faculty Fellow at Colby College!

The Department of Music congratulates Music Theory PhD alumna DrKate Heidemann.  Dr. Heidemann has been appointed Faculty Fellow in Music at Colby College for the 2014/15 academic year.  

Dr. Heidemann recently defended her dissertation, entitled "Hearing Women's Voices in Popular Song: Analyzing Sound and Identity in Country and Soul," advised by Professor Ellie Hisama. 

 

Dr. Beau Bothwell Appointed Assistant Professor of Music at Kalamazoo College!

The Department of Music congratulates Dr. Beau Bothwell, a recent alumnus of Columbia's PhD program in Musicology, who has accepted an appointment as Assistant Professor of Music at Kalamazoo College, to begin in September 2014.  

Beau Bothwell is currently Music Humanities Core Lecturer at Columbia University and Adjunct Professor of Music History at the Juilliard School.  He completed his PhD in Musicology in 2013 at Columbia, with a dissertation entitled "Song, State, Sawa: Music and Political Radio between the US and Syria," advised by Prof. Ellie Hisama.  

Dr. Bothwell has presented his research at numerous national and international conferences, including gatherings of the American Musicological Society, the Society for Ethnomusicology, the Middle East Studies Association, and the Society for American Music, and in invited lectures at Boston College, NYU's Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies, and Harvard University. Dr. Bothwell recently contributed a chapter to the volume The Soundtrack of Conflict: The Role of Music in Radio Broadcasting in Wartime and in Conflict Situations, and is writing a book on popular music and transnational radio in Syria and Lebanon.

Prof. Mariusz Kozak's Research Featured in Columbia News!

Prof. Mariusz Kozak, who recently joined Columbia's faculty in Music Theory, is the subject of a new article in Columbia News discussing his research. Author Gary Shapiro writes . . . 

"Kozak, who joined Columbia's Department of Music last July, is now taking that research interest a step further, studying the connection between how people listen and move to music. "Every known culture has some sort of combination of dance and music." Whether you're tapping your feet to jazz, nodding along to classical music or playing air guitar to rock 'n' roll, it is all material for his research. "The study of motion and music is an emerging area," said Kozak, who notes that interest in the subject has risen over the past decade or so as the technology for recording the movement of objects and people--motion capture--has improved."


Read more here!

 

Music Theory PhD student Orit Hilewicz Wins Founders Prize from International Society for the Study of Time (ISST)!

The Department congratulates Music Theory PhD Candidate Orit Hilewicz, who has received the Founders Prize for New Scholars at the triennial conference of the International Society for the Study of Time (ISST) for her paper "Tracing Space in Time: Morton Feldman's Rothko Chapel." 

The prize announcement may be read online here.

Ms. Hilewicz's paper explores the relationship between Rothko's chapel in Houston, TX, and Morton Feldman's 1971 composition titled Rothko Chapel, composed for the chapel space. Focusing on the temporal dimension of Feldman's work, she examines the piece as a case of musical ekphrasis, the musical representation of another artwork, and shows that the interaction between contrasting musical temporalities in Feldman's Rothko Chapel becomes a temporal trace of a visitor's experience in Rothko's chapel. This paper is part of a larger analysis project that explores points of intersection between music and the visual arts, studying ekphrastic musical works as text for the original works they represent.