Historical Musicology at Columbia University

HISTORICAL MUSICOLOGY LINKS

Graduate Studies in Historical Musicology

Historical Musicology Graduate Degree Requirements & Timetable

Courses in Historical Musicology

News and Events from Historical Musicology

Historical Musicology Faculty

Susan L. Boynton
Professor of Music
Chair, Department of Music
Area Chair, Historical Musicology

Walter M. Frisch
H. Harold Gumm/Harry and Albert Von Tilzer Professor of Music
Chair of Music Humanities
 
Giuseppe Gerbino
Associate Professor of Music
 
Ellie M. Hisama
Professor of Music

George E. Lewis
Edwin H. Case Professor of Music
Vice-Chair, Department of Music
Area Chair, Composition
    
Elaine R. Sisman
Anne Parsons Bender Professor of Music
Past President, American Musicological Society
 

AFFILIATED POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWS

Julia Doe
Mellon Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in Music

PROGRAMS OFFERED

PhD

Online Resources
Music Humanities Online

 

News & Events in Historical Musicology

Spring 2015 Colloquia

Spring 2015 Colloquia - Columbia University Department of Music

 

February 13: Joel Sachs (the Juilliard School)

"Weighing the Evidence: Problems for the Cowell Biographer." 

622 Dodge, 2 pm

 

February 13: "Tomorrow is the Question: Afrofuturism, Sound, and Spirit": panel discussion: http://ircpl.org/event/tomorrowisthequestion/

Union Theological Seminary, James Memorial Chapel, 7-9 pm

Sponsored by the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life Life; and co-sponsored by Columbia's Department of Music; Columbia University's Edwin H. Case Chair in American Music;  the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race; and the Department of Africana Studies at Barnard.

 

February 27: Digital Projects in Music Research

523 Butler Library, 2-5 pm

Presented by the Department of Music and the Columbia University Libraries

http://music.columbia.edu/DigitalProjects022715

 

March 6: Rick Hermann (University of New Mexico)

Verdi Challenges, the Ave Maria from the Quattro Pezzi Sacri-An Italian Approach?

622 Dodge, 2 pm

 

April 10: Roger Grant (Wesleyan University)

The Passions in Print: Musical Taxonomies and the First Death of Affect Theory

622 Dodge, 2 pm

 

April 17: Melissa Bilal (Columbia University)

"Finding Hay yerk [Armenian song]: Early Armenian Musicology between two Empires"

622 Dodge, 2 pm

 

Digital Projects in Music Research (Feb. 27, 2pm)

Event Date: 
Fri, 02/27/2015 - 2:00pm
Event Location: 
523 Butler Library, Columbia University

Digital Projects in Music Research

Friday, February 27, 2-5 pm, 523 Butler Library

Presented by the Department of Music and the Columbia University Libraries

 

Bringing the Songs Home: Music Repatriation Projects at the Center for Ethnomusicology (Aaron Fox)

Aaron Fox will discuss the Center for Ethnomusicology's ongoing projects to repatriate recordings of traditional and indigenous music (most from the 1930s and 1940s) to their source communities, and to return control over the publication of these archives, which includes the development of digital interfaces with these recordings and associated materials, including photographs and transcriptions, being developed in collaboration with indigenous elders, performers, educators, activists, and scholars.  Discussion to include projects with Hopi, Inupiat, Tsimshian, and Navajo communities.

You can find out more about this project here, here, and here.

 

Using motion-capture technology to study musical experience (Mariusz Kozak)

Mariusz Kozak will present ways in which motion-capture technologies can be used to study how musicians, listeners, and dancers experience music through movement. The project relates to a broader interest in using digital technology to interpret how human artifacts are appropriated by end users, and to critically examine how this technology enables new humanistic methodologies. Questions of value of motion-capture technology, as well as its practical applications in music creation, analysis, criticism, and pedagogy, will also be discussed.

Read more here.

 

Position Announcement: Two-Year Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowships

Two-Year Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowships-Lecturerships in Music at Columbia University

 

The Department of Music at Columbia University invites applications for Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowships. Appointment will be at the rank of Mellon Teaching Fellow/Lecturer, for a period of two years to begin July 1, 2015.  A PhD, DMA or the equivalent is required. The degree must have been received between 1 January 2011 and 1 July 2015. Fellows will be expected to do research, participate in the academic life of the Department of Music, and teach one course per semester in each of the two years (three in Columbia's Core Curriculum and one in the candidate's area of specialization).

 

Review of applications begins immediately and will continue until the positions are filled. For more information and to apply, please visit:  

https://academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=59823  

Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.

Prof. Susan Boynton Awarded Grant from Provost for Hybrid Learning

Susan Boynton (Department Chair) was awarded a grant from the Provost for the redesign of her spring 2015 graduate seminar (Music G8102, Seminar in Historical Musicology: the Middle Ages) to include an extensive digital humanities component. The seminar, held in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, will focus on the analysis and presentation of medieval liturgical manuscripts in the web environment, with a focus on manuscripts from Columbia and Barnard collections. The seminar will dedicate extensive time to study of the physical manuscripts, aided by Consuelo Dutschke (Curator of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts, RBML) and Alexis Hagadorn (Conservator and Head of the Conservation Program, Columbia University Libraries) as well as the Mellon Conservator for Special Collections, Vasare Rastonis. Read Boynton's description of her plans for the course here.

In addition to the funding for expenses such as digital photography of medieval manuscripts and recording of sound examples, the seminar will receive support from the Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning (CCNMTL) in the form of content development, instructional design, media production, systems integration, assessment and project management. 

In Memoriam: Professor Joel Newman, 1918-2014

The members of the Department of Music express our collective sorrow at the passing of our colleague, Emeritus Professor Joel Newman, and offers our sincere condolences to his family, students, colleagues, and friends. 

Below is Prof. Newman's obituary as it appeared in The New York Times on December 21, 2014.

Joel Newman, Ph.D. died in his home in Provincetown, Massachusetts on December 17, 2014. Born in Brooklyn, NY in 1918, he was 96. Dr. Newman played an important role in the early music revival in New York City. His 1962 doctoral thesis on the early Italian composer, Salamone Rossi, remains the definitive work on him. In the 1950's, Dr Newman became the musicologist for the New York Pro Musica and joined the music department at Columbia University. 

Dr. Newman taught at Columbia for more than 30 years and after retirement continued teaching as Professor Emeritus. Newman studied recorder with Bernard Krainis and played in the first American Recorder Society ensemble under Erich Katz. He was proficient on early instruments, piano, organ and harpsichord. He received the Distinguished Achievement Award from the American Record Society in 2007 for his work as a musicologist, music editor and musician. After retirement, Joel Newman settled in Provincetown, Massachusetts, ran his own sheet music business and was co- owner of the Provincetown Bookshop. He is predeceased by Elloyd Hanson, his husband and partner of 46 years, and by his brother, Morris Newman. Joel is survived by his twin sisters, Phoebe Sheres and Dorothy Swayze, and a host of fond nieces, nephews and great nieces and nephews. Joel will be greatly missed and remembered for his pithy sense of humor, his erudition and his charm.

Prof. George Lewis Interviewed in "I Care If You Listen" Magazine

Prof. George Lewis is featured in an interview in Issue 10 of I Care If You Listen magazine, entitled "The Past is Prologue," and written by Arlene and Larry Dunn. 

Fall 2014 Department of Music Newsletter Published!

The Department of Music is pleased to announce the publication of its Fall 2014 official Newsletter!

Please click here to open the Newsletter in PDF format. 

The Department also asks our friends and alumni to consider making a financial gift  in support of the Department's many initiatives and programs this holiday season.  Your generous gift will support many student needs directly, including graduate student conference and research travel, visiting speakers and performers, and needed improvements to classrooms and practice rooms. 

2015 will be an exciting year for the Department as we celebrate 50-year anniversaries for both the journal Current Musicology (in spring 2015) and the Center for Ethnomusicology (in fall 2015), in this the Department's 119th year.  

Please see the Newsletter for some of the outstanding upcoming events for the spring semester. 

Finally, we wish all our friends, affiliates, students, and colleagues a very happy, warm, and music-filled holiday season and extend our best wishes for the new year!

____________________________

Call for Papers: Current Musicology 50th Anniversary Conference, March 28-29, 2015 (Deadline for submissions is 1/15/15)

Call for Papers!

Current Musicology
50th Anniversary Conference

March 28-29, 2015 at Columbia University

Deadline for All Abstract Submissions: January 15, 2015

Submissions are invited for a conference commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the journal Current Musicology. As a tribute to Current Musicology's multidisciplinary orientation, which combines perspectives from different areas of music scholarship, we welcome proposals for 20-minute paper presentations on any topic related to the areas of historical musicology, ethnomusicology, music theory and analysis, philosophy of music, popular music studies, music education, and related fields. Papers presented at the conference will be considered for publication in the journal's celebratory special issue.

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To submit a proposal, please e-mail your name, institution, e-mail address, and an abstract of no more than 250 words to current-musicology@columbia.edu by January 15, 2015, with the subject line "Conference Submission." The committee will select papers anonymously. All scholars who submit abstracts will be notified of the committee's decision by February 1, 2015.
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Prof. Ellie Hisama Wins Curriculum Development Grant from IRWGS

The Department of Music congratulates Professor Ellie Hisama, who was awarded an inaugural curriculum development grant from Columbia's Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Funded by the Mellon Foundation and the Heyman Center, the grant supports development of a new course titled "Feminist Listening: Critical and Intersectional Approaches to Popular Music," which Prof. Hisama expects to offer in 2015 or 2016.   

Prof. Ana María Ochoa Gautier Publishes "Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia"

In Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia, Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier explores how listening has been central to the production of notions of language, music, voice, and sound that determine the politics of life. Drawing primarily from nineteenth-century Colombian sources, Ochoa Gautier locates sounds produced by different living entities at the juncture of the human and nonhuman. Her "acoustically tuned" analysis of a wide array of texts reveals multiple debates on the nature of the aural. These discussions were central to a politics of the voice harnessed in the service of the production of different notions of personhood and belonging. In Ochoa Gautier's groundbreaking work, Latin America and the Caribbean emerge as a historical site where the politics of life and the politics of expression inextricably entangle the musical and the linguistic, knowledge and the sensorial.

Order or learn more about Aurality at the website of Duke University Press. 


Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier is Associate Professor of Music and Director of the Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University. She is the author of several books and many articles.

Congratulations to Dr. Harald Kisiedu

The Department congratulates Dr. Harald Kisiedu, who recently defended his dissertation, "European Echoes: Jazz Experimentalism
in Germany, 1950-1975." Dr. Kisiedu's dissertation was sponsored by Prof. George Lewis. 

 

Dr. Bryan Parkhurst Appointed Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Music!

The Department of Music is delighted to welcome Dr. Bryan Parkhurst as an incoming Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow for 2014-16!

Dr. Parkhurst earned his PhD in philosophy and music theory from the University of Michigan, where he was supported by both a Regents Fellowship and a Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship.  His dissertation, "Sound's Arguments: Philosophical Encounters with Music Theory," which was written under the supervision of Kendall Walton, Ramon Satyendra, and Kevin Korsyn, engages closely with the thought of such figures as Schenker, Lewin, Kant, Hegel, Hanslick, Schopenhauer, Dewey, and Wittgenstein.   He is currently researching a book about Hegel and Hauptmann.  Additionally, Bryan is interested in Marxist philosophy generally and Marxist aesthetics in particular, as well as in the grand question of whether and how it is possible for music to be philosophy (Marxist or otherwise).  Bryan's recent publications appear in Music Theory Online, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, The Journal of Interdisciplinary Humanities, and elsewhere.  He is a also a harpist and accordionist. 

Graduating Seniors Olivia Munson, Josh Owens, & Alexander Porter Win Departmental Honors!

The Department of Music is pleased to announce that Departmental Honors for 2014 are awarded to the following graduating senior music majors:

Alexander Porter (Columbia College) for his project (advised by Prof. Joseph Dubiel), "Of Diagrammatology in Music and Architecture," which included both an extended essay and two original creative works, a composition called "Diachronism" and a short play called "Broken Images."  All were woven together by Alex's stimulating, imaginative exploration of time, memory, and space across both musical and architectural dimensions. A complete PDF version of Alexander's thesis can be downloaded here.

Olivia Munson (Columbia College) for her essay (advised by Prof. Aaron Fox) "A Space for Musical Therapy: On Nationalism, Modernity, Music, and Medicine in the Transition from Ottoman Empire to Turkish Republic."  This essay looks at the use of music for medicinal or therapeutic purposes across broad historical span of Turkish history.  Olivia's essay represents an impressive combination of on-the-ground fieldwork and sophisticated theoretical-historical analysis.

Congratulations to all our graduates!

Photos: graduates, their families, and their professors at the Commencement reception in Dodge Hall on May 21, 2014.

The Department of Music Congratulates our 2014 Grads!

Columbia College: (CON = "concentrator"/  MAJ = "major")
Agard-Wilson, Chancellor CON
Assor, Isaac  MAJ
Bunch, Isaac  MAJ
Dugan, Anna MAJ
Frech, Robert  MAJ
Garinois, Alessandro  MAJ
Genova, Jerome  MAJ
Harris, Olivia MAJ
Hoffman, Solomon  MAJ
Horstman, Spencer CON
Koski, Gregory  CON
Lagunas, Rudy  MAJ
Kevin  MAJ
Lim, Youngmook CON
Matern, Lukas  MAJ
McCormick, Kyle  MAJ
Munson, Olivia  MAJ
Nez, Ferguson  MAJ
Porter, Alexander MAJ
Rinehart, Amalia  MAJ
Safavi Ardebili, Amir Hossein  MAJ
Sonett, Caroline  MAJ
Street, Lena  MAJ
Sturr, Jonathan  MAJ
Toy, Norman  MAJ
Worthington, Michelle CON 

Columbia School of General Studies:
Bosco, Christopher MAJ  
Cercone, James  MAJ
Owens, Joshua  MAJ
Starcher, Sarah Jane  MAJ

Columbia College Special Major in Ethnomusicology:
Veena Kumar

Barnard Music Majors Graduates:
Kristina Dorsett  (Ethnomusicology)
Catherine Mullen  (Ethnomusicology)
Debra Rosenbaum (Ethnomusicology)
Hana Rosenbaum (Ethnomusicology)
Julia Sayles 

Graduate School of Arts & Sciences  PhD/DMA:
Belkind, Nili (PhD)
Bryan, Courtney (DMA)
Di Castri, Zosha (DMA)
Eggert, Andrew (PhD)
Forshaw, Juliet (PhD)
Heidemann, Katherine (PhD)
Johnson, Aaron (PhD)
King, Jonathan (PhD)
Kisiedu, Harald (PhD)
Morrison, Matthew (PhD)
Nail, Ashley (DMA)
Newland, Marti (PhD)
Schmeder, Maximillian (PhD)
Tallgren, Johan (DMA)

Congratulations to our 2014 Doctoral Graduates!

Photos: Smiles at the GSAS doctoral convocation on Sunday, May 18, 2014 and at the department's luncheon on Wednesday, May 21 after Commencement.

We congratulate our new doctoral alumni!

Graduate School of Arts & Sciences  PhD/DMA:

Dr. Juliet Forshaw Appointed Visiting Assistant Professor at SUNY Oswego!

The Department congratulates Dr. Juliet Forshaw (PhD, Historical Musicology, 2014), who has been appointed Visiting Assistant Professor at SUNY Oswego for 2014-15. Juliet recently defended her dissertation, "Dangerous Basses, Heroic Tenors, and Non-Ingenues: Singers and the Envoicing of Social Values in Russian Opera, 1836-1905."

Elaine Sisman Elected Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences!

Elaine Sisman, Anne Parsons Bender Professor of Music (Historical Musicology), has been elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among the members are some of the world's most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, artists, and civic, corporate, and philanthropic leaders: see the complete list here and the press release here.

Dr. Julia Doe appointed Assistant Professor of Music

The Department of Music at Columbia University welcomes Dr. Julia Doe who has been appointed as Assistant Professor of Music.

Dr. Doe holds a Ph.D. in musicology from Yale University, where she also served as an affiliate of the Whitney Humanities Center. She is a scholar of eighteenth-century opera, with particular emphasis on the music, literature, and politics of the French Enlightenment. Her current book project examines the development of opera-comique in the final decades of the Old Regime, as it engaged with emerging discourses of national and cosmopolitan musical style. Portions of this work have appeared in The Opera Journal, and have been supported by grants and prizes from the Fulbright Program, the National Opera Association, and the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Dr. Doe is presently completing a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at Columbia and will begin a tenure-track appointment in the summer of 2015.