Info for Current Columbia Students

Prof. Kevin Fellezs Gives Woody Guthrie Distinguished Lecture at IASPM-US

Professor Kevin Fellezs will be giving the 2014 Woody Guthrie Distinguished Lecture at the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, US Branch (IASPM-US) annual conference on Saturday, March 15, 2014, at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Fellezs's talk is titled "What Is This 'Black' In Japanese Popular Music? (Re)Imagining Race in a Transnational Polycultural Context," which focuses on his research of Black American musicians enjoying success in Japan in enka and J-Pop, two genres strongly associated with Japanese-ness, complicating conventional ideas linking identity, nationality, race, and genre.

"Varied Pitches to Fill Empty Spaces:" Prof. Georg Haas Profiled in The New York Times

Prof. Georg F. Haas, recently appointed as Professor of Music Composition at Columbia, is featured in a Feb. 20, 2014 profle in the New York Times, entitled Varied Pitches to Fill Empty Spaces: Georg Friedrich Haas's Works Are Rooted in Microtonality.  The article was written by Vivien Schweitzer.  


Read the profile here!

An excerpt:

Mr. Haas's works are rooted in microtonality -- a system that divides the conventional scale of Western classical music into many more than its usual 12 semitone pitches. (His opera "Thomas" incorporates some 1,600 different pitches.) In Europe, composers like Ligeti and Penderecki used microtones; American composers including Charles Ives, Harry Partch and La Monte Young have also breached the standard division of the octave.

In Mr. Haas's scores, these microtones result in opulent and otherworldly harmonies that at times seem impossible to have been produced by acoustic instruments. On the two occasions I heard the excellent Argento Chamber Ensemble perform his "In Vain," a masterpiece of glistening sonorities that unfurls in hypnotic waves of sound, I had the sense of hearing something unique.

 

Prof. Mariusz Kozak's Research Featured in Columbia News!

Prof. Mariusz Kozak, who recently joined Columbia's faculty in Music Theory, is the subject of a new article in Columbia News discussing his research. Author Gary Shapiro writes . . . 

"Kozak, who joined Columbia's Department of Music last July, is now taking that research interest a step further, studying the connection between how people listen and move to music. "Every known culture has some sort of combination of dance and music." Whether you're tapping your feet to jazz, nodding along to classical music or playing air guitar to rock 'n' roll, it is all material for his research. "The study of motion and music is an emerging area," said Kozak, who notes that interest in the subject has risen over the past decade or so as the technology for recording the movement of objects and people--motion capture--has improved."


Read more here!

 

Congratulations to Columbia DMA Composition Students!

Fall 2013 News and announcements from the Composition Program 

The Department of Music extends congratulations to DMA students from the Composition Program for their many accomplishments in Fall 2013!
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Yoshiaki Onishi

Yoshiaki Onishi's Gaudeamus-commissioned work "Tramespace, diptych for large ensemble, Part I" (2012~13) was performed by Asko|Schonberg Ensemble in September 2013 in Utrecht, The Netherlands.

 

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Taylor Brook

 

Taylor Brook received an honorable mention from the Jules Leger prize for the second year in a row as well as MIVOS prize for El jardin de senderos que se bifurcan, a string quartet composed for a CC concert.

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Zosha Di Castri

 

Zosha di Castri's music received numerous performances.  This past September, there were three performances of "Lineage" by the San Francisco Symphony, directed by Michael Tilson Thomas.  "The Animal After Whom Other Animals Are Named", commissioned by Ekmeles, received its premiere with the help of the Canada Council for the Arts. She has received a commission for Esprit Orchestra for May 2014.  The Toronto Symphony Orchestra, conducted by John Adams, will perform her "Lineage" in March 2014.

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Alec Hall

Alec Hall was elected for the Ensemble Contemporain de Montreal's "Generation 2014" project. The award consists of a workshop in Montreal this March, followed by a week in Banff in November, then an 8-city/concert cross-Canada tour.

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Ashkan Behzadi

 

Ashkan Behzadi received Second Prize in the SOCAN young composer competition for 2013. He also won the Sir Ernest MacMillan Awards for "Urban Trilogy" for chamber orchestra, the Fontainebleau Prix de Composition  for "Az hoosh mi.." for soprano and violin, and was named the winner of the APNM competition/call for scores for "Az hoosh mi.." for soprano and violin.

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Sky Macklay

 

Sky MacKlay's orchestra piece Dissolving Bands was awarded the Leo Kaplan Award, the top prize in the ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards.

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Bryan Jacobs

 

Bryan Jacobs' Dis Un Il Im Ir received Honorable Mention in the Conlon Music 2013 competition (Amsterdam). Le La en Le received First Prize in the Presque Rien 2013 competition (Paris).

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Christopher Trapani

 

Christopher Trapani was named the winner of the Third Jezek Prize in Composition, 2013.

 

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Courtney Bryan

 

Courtney Bryan's New Work for orchestra and recorded sound was commissioned by American Composers Orchestra Underground Ensemble, for a Carnegie Hall, New York, NY, 2015-16 premiere. Walking with 'Trane, a collaboration, was commissioned by Urban Bush Women, New York, NY, for 2014 premiere. And New Work for String Quartet was commissioned by Spektral String Quartet for Mobile Miniatures Project, for a Chicago, IL, 2014 premiere.

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Nina C. Young

 

Nina C. Young's Remnants received the Audience Choice Award at the ACO's 2013 Underwood New Music Readings. Tanglewood Music Center has also commissioned new work from Ms. Young  for the 2014 TMC Brass Ensemble.

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Stylianos Dimou

 

 

Stylianos Dimou participated in the Royaumont Voix nouvelles composition course 2013, and the 5th Composers' Forum ['tactus 2013] with the Brussels Philharmonic; Mr. Dimou's L'allegorie de la caverne, for orchestra (2011-2012) was selected as the winning piece to be performed again by the Brussels Philharmonic in 2014.

Prof. Jeffrey Milarsky Wins The Ditson Conductor’s Award

The Department of Music congratulates Professor Jeffrey Milarsky, conductor of the Columbia University Orchestra, on the occasion of his being awarded The Ditson Conductor's Award.  

The Ditson Conductor's Award is awarded for distinguished contributions to American music, and given annually by Columbia University. It was presented to Prof. Milarsky at Alice Tully Hall on November 15, during a concert by the Juilliard Orchestra conducted by Prof. Milarsky. The $5,000 award, which was established in 1945, was presented by the pianist Gilbert Kalish, the head of the Ditson advisory committee.

Read more at The New York Times. 

Hear the CU Orchestra perform music of Debussy, Strauss, and Prokofiev, under the direction of Maestro Milarsky, on Sunday, December 1st (8PM, Roone Arledge Auditorium) and again on Sunday December 8, 2013 (8PM, Miller Theater). Both concerts are free and open to the public!

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Adam Kielman Wins Three Prizes (MACSEM, SAM, and ACMR)

The Department of Music congratulates Ethnomusicology PhD candidate Adam Kielman, who has won three prestigious prizes for papers presented at academic conferences, in addition to a major research fellowship (Fulbright DDRA) for his work in China.

The prizes awarded to Mr. Kielman include: 

The Hewitt Pantaleoni Prize  -- Awarded by the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Society of Ethnomusicology (MACSEM) for the best student paper presented at their annual meeting held March 23-24, 2013 in Richmond, VA. Paper title: " 'Sounds like Home': Language and Place in Guangzhou's Modern Folk."

The Martin Hatch Award  -- Awarded by the Society for Asian Music (SAM) for the best student paper on Asian music presented at the annual Society for Ethnomusicology national meeting held November 1-4, 2012 in New Orleans, LA. Paper title: "Xiandai Minyao: 'Modern Folk' in Guangzhou."

The Barbara Barnard Smith Prize -- Awarded by the Association for Chinese Music Research (ACMR) to recognize an outstanding student paper in the field of Chinese music, broadly defined, presented at the annual Society for Ethnomusicology national meeting held November 1-4, 2012 in New Orleans, LA. Paper title: "Xiandai Minyao: 'Modern Folk' in Guangzhou."

 

Mr. Kielman, who is also an alumnus of Columbia College (EALAC major, LAJPP performer), has also just successfully defended his doctoral dissertation proposal, entitled "Sounding Configurations of Difference in Postsocialist China."  He is preparing to depart for field research in China with support from a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship, awarded in September 2013.

Congratulations to Mr. Kielman!

Prof. Giuseppe Gerbino Interviewed in "Around The Quad" (Columbia College Today)

Professor Giuseppe Gerbino, Chairman of the Department of Music, was interviewed for the Fall 2013 issue of Columbia College Today in their "Around the Quad" feature.  

The interview, entitled "Five Minutes With Giuseppe Gerbino," is available here or can be downloaded as a PDF file here.

CU Alum Amanda Minks Publishes "Voices of Play: Miskitu Children's Speech and Song on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua"

The Department congratulates PhD program alumna Prof. Amanda Minks (University of Oklahoma, PhD in Ethnomusicology, Columbia, 2006), who has just published Voices of Play: Miskitu Children's Speech and Song on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua with the University of Arizona Press' "First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies" series (2013).

While indigenous languages have become prominent in global political and educational discourses, limited attention has been given to indigenous children's everyday communication. Voices of Play  is a study of multilingual play and performance among Miskitu children growing up on Corn Island, part of a multi-ethnic autonomous region on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua.

Corn Island is historically home to Afro-Caribbean Creole people, but increasing numbers of Miskitu people began moving there from the mainland during the Contra War, and many Spanish-speaking mestizos from western Nicaragua have also settled there. Miskitu kids on Corn Island often gain some competence speaking Miskitu, Spanish, and Kriol English. As the children of migrants and the first generation of their families to grow up with television, they develop creative forms of expression that combine languages and genres, shaping intercultural senses of belonging.

Voices of Play, which began as Prof. Mink's PhD dissertation in Ethnomusicology at Columbia (with support from the Social Science Research Council), is the first ethnography to focus on the interaction between music and language in children's discourse. Minks skillfully weaves together Latin American, North American, and European theories of culture and communication, creating a transdisciplinary dialogue that moves across intellectual geographies. Her analysis shows how music and language involve a wide range of communicative resources that create new forms of belonging and enable dialogue across differences. Miskitu children's voices reveal the intertwining of speech and song, the emergence of "self" and "other," and the centrality of aesthetics to social struggle.

Amanda Minks is Associate Professor in the Honors College and is affiliated with the Department of Anthropology and with the programs in Native American Studies and Women's and Gender Studies at Oklahoma University. She earned the PhD in Ethnomusicology at Columbia University in 2006.

CU Alum David Novak Publishes "Japanoise: Music at the Edge of Circulation"

The Department congratulates 2006 Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD program alumnus Prof. David Novak (UCSB), who has just published Japanoise: Music at the Edge of Circulation (Duke University Press, 2013).

Noise, an underground music made through an amalgam of feedback, distortion, and electronic effects, first emerged as a genre in the 1980s, circulating on cassette tapes traded between fans in Japan, Europe, and North America. With its cultivated obscurity, ear-shattering sound, and over-the-top performances, Noise has captured the imagination of a small but passionate transnational audience.

For its scattered listeners, Noise always seems to be new and to come from somewhere else: in North America, it was called "Japanoise." But does Noise really belong to Japan? Is it even music at all? And why has Noise become such a compelling metaphor for the complexities of globalization and participatory media at the turn of the millennium?

In Japanoise, which began as a doctoral dissertation in Ethnomusicology at Columbia (with support from the Social Science Research Council), David Novak draws on more than a decade of research in Japan and the United States to trace the "cultural feedback" that generates and sustains Noise. He provides a rich ethnographic account of live performances, the circulation of recordings, and the lives and creative practices of musicians and listeners. He explores the technologies of Noise and the productive distortions of its networks. Capturing the textures of feedback--its sonic and cultural layers and vibrations--Novak describes musical circulation through sound and listening, recording and performance, international exchange, and the social interpretations of media.

Visit the Japanoise book website: http://www.japanoise.com/

David Novak is Associate Professor of Music at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and earned the PhD in Ethnomusicology in 2006, after which he served as a postdoctoral fellow in Columbia's Society of Fellows.

CU Alum Matthew Sakakeeny Publishes "Roll With It: Brass Bands on the Streets of New Orleans"

The Department congratulates Prof. Matthew Sakakeeny (Tulane University, Columbia PhD in Ethnomusicology 2008) has just published Roll With It: Brass Bands in the Streets of New Orleans (with artwork by Willie Birch)

Roll With It, which began as Prof. Sakakeeny's doctoral dissertation in Ethnmusicology at Columbia (with support from the National Science Foundation), is a firsthand account of the precarious lives of musicians in the Rebirth, Soul Rebels, and Hot 8 brass bands of New Orleans. The gripping narrative moves with the band members from back street to backstage, before and after Hurricane Katrina, always in step with the tap of the snare drum, the thud of the bass drum, and the boom of the tuba.

Matthew Sakakeeny is an ethnomusicologist and journalist, New Orleans resident and musician. An Assistant Professor of Music at Tulane University, he initially moved to New Orleans to work as a co-producer of the public radio program American Routes.

Read the introduction to Roll With It on Scribd.

Roll With It also features a supplementary website.

Published by Duke University Press in their "Refiguring American Music Series" in  2013

Columbia Libraries Acquire Prokofiev Archives

Read about Columbia Libraries' acquisition of the Sergei Prokofiev Archive in the New York Times

NEW YORK, October 17, 2013 - Columbia University Libraries/Information Services' Rare Book & Manuscript Library (RBML) is pleased to announce the acquisition of the collection of Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953).  The Serge Prokofiev Foundation has chosen the RBML as the repository for the archival material under its control from Prokofiev's 18 years in the West.

The Foundation was established in 1983 by Lina Prokofiev, the composer's widow, to enrich public awareness of Prokofiev's life and work and to encourage research. (The organization uses a variant spelling of the composer's first name).  After her death in 1989 at age 91, and the death of her sons Sviatoslav and Oleg, the work of the Foundation has been carried on by their descendants.

The collection includes Prokofiev's private and business papers from 1919 through May 1936, after which he returned to the Soviet Union with his family. Correspondents include conductors such as Sir Henry Wood and Sergei Koussevitzky; soloists such as Joseph Szigeti and Pablo Casals; composers such as Igor Stravinsky and Maurice Ravel; and chess grandmaster Jose Capablanca.

The Ethnomusicology Track in the Barnard College Music Major

 

Curious about the Barnard College "Ethnomusicology track" in the Music Major?   Read this carefully!

(Specific requirements for the BC Ethnomusicology track are below).

Barnard College is one of the few colleges in the US where you can complete an undergraduate major in the field of Ethnomusicology, specifically. This academic major track (please note that it does not focus on the performance of non-western music, although there are opportunities for doing this) provides a unique opportunity for BC students with a serious and scholarly interest in the field of Ethnomusicology. This track is especially intended to prepare students for graduate study and careers in music, anthropology, music business and technology, and library/information science, among other related fields. 

This program offers undergraduates rich access to the faculty and resources of Columbia's highly-ranked graduate (MA/PhD) program in Ethnomusicology. The undergraduate offering has a long and distinguished track record as a "special major" at Barnard.  In 2009, the special major was converted into a pre-approved major track within the BC Music major.  (NB: Columbia College/GS students cannot pursue this track in the Music major; please contact Prof. Fox if you are a CC/GS student with a specific interest in pursuing Ethnomusicology.) 

Music Theory PhD student Orit Hilewicz Wins Founders Prize from International Society for the Study of Time (ISST)!

The Department congratulates Music Theory PhD Candidate Orit Hilewicz, who has received the Founders Prize for New Scholars at the triennial conference of the International Society for the Study of Time (ISST) for her paper "Tracing Space in Time: Morton Feldman's Rothko Chapel." 

The prize announcement may be read online here.

Ms. Hilewicz's paper explores the relationship between Rothko's chapel in Houston, TX, and Morton Feldman's 1971 composition titled Rothko Chapel, composed for the chapel space. Focusing on the temporal dimension of Feldman's work, she examines the piece as a case of musical ekphrasis, the musical representation of another artwork, and shows that the interaction between contrasting musical temporalities in Feldman's Rothko Chapel becomes a temporal trace of a visitor's experience in Rothko's chapel. This paper is part of a larger analysis project that explores points of intersection between music and the visual arts, studying ekphrastic musical works as text for the original works they represent. 

Prof. Kevin Fellezs Wins Provost's Diversity Grant!

The Department of Music congratulates Prof. Kevin Fellezs, who is one of 8 faculty members recognized under the Provost's Grant Program for "Junior Faculty Who Contribute to the Diversity Goals of the University." These awards, of up to $25,000 each, support new or ongoing research and scholarship, seed funding for innovative research for which external funding would be difficult to obtain, and curricular development projects.

Prof. Fellezs, who is jointly appointed in the Department of Music and in the Institute for Research in African-American Studies, and is affiliated with the Center for Jazz Studies, was awarded this grant for his project Sound Waves Across the Waters: The Polycultural Music of Japanese and American Smooth Jazz Artists.  

Center for Ethnomusicology Featured in Columbia News and on WNYC's Soundcheck

The Center for Ethnomusicology's projects to "repatriate" recordings of collector Laura Boulton,  conducted in collaboration with Native American and Alaska Native communities, are featured in a story in Columbia News, and in a video feature on the Columbia University home page.

Prof. Aaron Fox was also interviewed about these projects by John Schaefer on WNYC's SoundCheck program. Listen to the program to hear several examples of music from the Laura Boulton collection!

Columbia Welcomes Professor Mariusz Kozak!

 

The Department of Music is delighted to welcome Mariusz Kozak to our faculty in Music Theory.  Prof. Kozak will join Columbia University as an Assistant Professor of Music in July, 2013.  He is currently a post-doctoral scholar and visiting assistant professor of music theory at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music.  His research focuses on the emergence of musical meaning in contemporary art music, the development and cognitive bases of musical experience, and the phenomenology of bodily interactions in musical behavior. In his work, he attempts to bridge experimental approaches from embodied cognition with phenomenology and music analysis, in particular using motion-capture technology to study the movements of performers and listeners. His current project examines how listeners' understanding and experience of musical time are shaped by bodily actions and gestures.

 
As a violinist, Kozak has performed with the Rochester Philharmonic, the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra, the Santa Fe Opera, and the Santa Fe Symphony. After a stint with a Chicago-based country band, he continues to fiddle around in his spare time.
 

Columbia Welcomes Professor Georg Friedrich Haas!

Georg Friedrich Haas joined Columbia University's composition faculty as a full-time tenured professor in September, 2013. This appointment promises to sustain and enhance our composition program's reputation as one of the strongest, most progressive, and most international such programs in the United States.

Haas has emerged as one of the major European composers of his generation. His music synthesizes in a highly original way the Austrian tradition of grand orchestral statement with forward-looking interests in harmonic color and microtonal tuning that stem from both French spectralism and a strand of American experimentalism. The result is an exploratory, uncompromising music that is also sensuously attractive. His music appeals to unusually diverse constituencies, from avant-garde composers for its microtonal investigations to casual listeners for its spacious forms and euphonious harmony.

Giuseppe Gerbino wins Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award

Congratulations to Giuseppe Gerbino, Associate Professor of Historical Musicology and Chair of the Department, on winning the Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award. Established on a  donation from trustee Gerry Lenfest (Law '58), the Lenfest award recognizes faculty who demonstrate unusual merit in scholarship, university citizenship, and professional involvement. Professor Gerbino will receive an award of $25,000 per year for a three-year period.

Sound Arts MFA and Computer Music Center Featured in Columbia Spectator

Columbia's Computer Music Center and the new School of the Arts MFA Program in Sound Arts are featured in an article in the Feb. 7, 2013 Columbia Spectator.  The article, by Derek Arthur, is entitled:  "Computer Music Center combines technology, music in experimental setting."

An accompanying video clip, featuring Prof. Brad Garton and Douglas Repetto, can be viewed below or on YouTube.

 

Announcing a New MFA Program in Sound Arts at Columbia!

New Program Announcement!

SOUND ARTS

A new Interdepartmental MFA Program offered by the Columbia University School of the Arts in association with the Department of Music and the Computer Music Center.

Applications for Fall 2013 Now Being Accepted (Deadline Feb. 20, 2013)
 
Columbia University has been at the helm of sound-technology innovation for over fifty years with faculty specializing in composition, improvisation, sound installation, computer music, digital sound synthesis, acoustics, music cognition and software development.  Columbia's Computer Music Center in the Department of Music has a long history of creative excellence; its primary mission is to operate at the intersection of musical expression and technological development. The Center has state-of-the-art facilities for working in electro-acoustic music.  Faculty of the Center for Computer Music led the development of the new interdisciplinary area in Sound Arts that leads to the Master of Fine Arts degree awarded by the School of the Arts.

 
The Sound Arts area is currently accepting applications for Fall 2013. The program is highly selective. Each year only three to four students will be offered admission to the two-year program. Prospective students with a deep engagement with sound as medium, a familiarity with contemporary audio tools and techniques, and a demonstrated use of those tools in different contexts (sculptural or video installations, creation of performance interfaces, circuit-bending productions, innovative fusion of digital audio with digital graphics, imaginative use of network technologies) are encouraged to apply. While the Visual Arts Program in the School of the Arts currently accommodates students working in digital media, sculpture, installation, performance, film and video art, applicants who wish to base their research and studio practice primarily in the area of sonic or sound arts are to apply to the area of Sound Arts. 
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