Info for Current Columbia Students

Columbia Libraries Acquire Prokofiev Archives

Read about Columbia Libraries' acquisition of the Sergei Prokofiev Archive in the New York Times

NEW YORK, October 17, 2013 - Columbia University Libraries/Information Services' Rare Book & Manuscript Library (RBML) is pleased to announce the acquisition of the collection of Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953).  The Serge Prokofiev Foundation has chosen the RBML as the repository for the archival material under its control from Prokofiev's 18 years in the West.

The Foundation was established in 1983 by Lina Prokofiev, the composer's widow, to enrich public awareness of Prokofiev's life and work and to encourage research. (The organization uses a variant spelling of the composer's first name).  After her death in 1989 at age 91, and the death of her sons Sviatoslav and Oleg, the work of the Foundation has been carried on by their descendants.

The collection includes Prokofiev's private and business papers from 1919 through May 1936, after which he returned to the Soviet Union with his family. Correspondents include conductors such as Sir Henry Wood and Sergei Koussevitzky; soloists such as Joseph Szigeti and Pablo Casals; composers such as Igor Stravinsky and Maurice Ravel; and chess grandmaster Jose Capablanca.

The Ethnomusicology Track in the Barnard College Music Major

 

Curious about the Barnard College "Ethnomusicology track" in the Music Major?   Read this carefully!

(Specific requirements for the BC Ethnomusicology track are below).

Barnard College is one of the few colleges in the US where you can complete an undergraduate major in the field of Ethnomusicology, specifically. This academic major track (please note that it does not focus on the performance of non-western music, although there are opportunities for doing this) provides a unique opportunity for BC students with a serious and scholarly interest in the field of Ethnomusicology. This track is especially intended to prepare students for graduate study and careers in music, anthropology, music business and technology, and library/information science, among other related fields. 

This program offers undergraduates rich access to the faculty and resources of Columbia's highly-ranked graduate (MA/PhD) program in Ethnomusicology. The undergraduate offering has a long and distinguished track record as a "special major" at Barnard.  In 2009, the special major was converted into a pre-approved major track within the BC Music major.  (NB: Columbia College/GS students cannot pursue this track in the Music major; please contact Prof. Fox if you are a CC/GS student with a specific interest in pursuing Ethnomusicology.) 

Music Theory PhD student Orit Hilewicz Wins Founders Prize from International Society for the Study of Time (ISST)!

The Department congratulates Music Theory PhD Candidate Orit Hilewicz, who has received the Founders Prize for New Scholars at the triennial conference of the International Society for the Study of Time (ISST) for her paper "Tracing Space in Time: Morton Feldman's Rothko Chapel." 

The prize announcement may be read online here.

Ms. Hilewicz's paper explores the relationship between Rothko's chapel in Houston, TX, and Morton Feldman's 1971 composition titled Rothko Chapel, composed for the chapel space. Focusing on the temporal dimension of Feldman's work, she examines the piece as a case of musical ekphrasis, the musical representation of another artwork, and shows that the interaction between contrasting musical temporalities in Feldman's Rothko Chapel becomes a temporal trace of a visitor's experience in Rothko's chapel. This paper is part of a larger analysis project that explores points of intersection between music and the visual arts, studying ekphrastic musical works as text for the original works they represent. 

Prof. Kevin Fellezs Wins Provost's Diversity Grant!

The Department of Music congratulates Prof. Kevin Fellezs, who is one of 8 faculty members recognized under the Provost's Grant Program for "Junior Faculty Who Contribute to the Diversity Goals of the University." These awards, of up to $25,000 each, support new or ongoing research and scholarship, seed funding for innovative research for which external funding would be difficult to obtain, and curricular development projects.

Prof. Fellezs, who is jointly appointed in the Department of Music and in the Institute for Research in African-American Studies, and is affiliated with the Center for Jazz Studies, was awarded this grant for his project Sound Waves Across the Waters: The Polycultural Music of Japanese and American Smooth Jazz Artists.  

Center for Ethnomusicology Featured in Columbia News and on WNYC's Soundcheck

The Center for Ethnomusicology's projects to "repatriate" recordings of collector Laura Boulton,  conducted in collaboration with Native American and Alaska Native communities, are featured in a story in Columbia News, and in a video feature on the Columbia University home page.

Prof. Aaron Fox was also interviewed about these projects by John Schaefer on WNYC's SoundCheck program. Listen to the program to hear several examples of music from the Laura Boulton collection!

Columbia Welcomes Professor Mariusz Kozak!

 

The Department of Music is delighted to welcome Mariusz Kozak to our faculty in Music Theory.  Prof. Kozak will join Columbia University as an Assistant Professor of Music in July, 2013.  He is currently a post-doctoral scholar and visiting assistant professor of music theory at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music.  His research focuses on the emergence of musical meaning in contemporary art music, the development and cognitive bases of musical experience, and the phenomenology of bodily interactions in musical behavior. In his work, he attempts to bridge experimental approaches from embodied cognition with phenomenology and music analysis, in particular using motion-capture technology to study the movements of performers and listeners. His current project examines how listeners' understanding and experience of musical time are shaped by bodily actions and gestures.

 
As a violinist, Kozak has performed with the Rochester Philharmonic, the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra, the Santa Fe Opera, and the Santa Fe Symphony. After a stint with a Chicago-based country band, he continues to fiddle around in his spare time.
 

Columbia Welcomes Professor Georg Friedrich Haas!

Georg Friedrich Haas joined Columbia University's composition faculty as a full-time tenured professor in September, 2013. This appointment promises to sustain and enhance our composition program's reputation as one of the strongest, most progressive, and most international such programs in the United States.

Haas has emerged as one of the major European composers of his generation. His music synthesizes in a highly original way the Austrian tradition of grand orchestral statement with forward-looking interests in harmonic color and microtonal tuning that stem from both French spectralism and a strand of American experimentalism. The result is an exploratory, uncompromising music that is also sensuously attractive. His music appeals to unusually diverse constituencies, from avant-garde composers for its microtonal investigations to casual listeners for its spacious forms and euphonious harmony.

Giuseppe Gerbino wins Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award

Congratulations to Giuseppe Gerbino, Associate Professor of Historical Musicology and Chair of the Department, on winning the Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award. Established on a  donation from trustee Gerry Lenfest (Law '58), the Lenfest award recognizes faculty who demonstrate unusual merit in scholarship, university citizenship, and professional involvement. Professor Gerbino will receive an award of $25,000 per year for a three-year period.

Sound Arts MFA and Computer Music Center Featured in Columbia Spectator

Columbia's Computer Music Center and the new School of the Arts MFA Program in Sound Arts are featured in an article in the Feb. 7, 2013 Columbia Spectator.  The article, by Derek Arthur, is entitled:  "Computer Music Center combines technology, music in experimental setting."

An accompanying video clip, featuring Prof. Brad Garton and Douglas Repetto, can be viewed below or on YouTube.

 

Announcing a New MFA Program in Sound Arts at Columbia!

New Program Announcement!

SOUND ARTS

A new Interdepartmental MFA Program offered by the Columbia University School of the Arts in association with the Department of Music and the Computer Music Center.

Applications for Fall 2013 Now Being Accepted (Deadline Feb. 20, 2013)
 
Columbia University has been at the helm of sound-technology innovation for over fifty years with faculty specializing in composition, improvisation, sound installation, computer music, digital sound synthesis, acoustics, music cognition and software development.  Columbia's Computer Music Center in the Department of Music has a long history of creative excellence; its primary mission is to operate at the intersection of musical expression and technological development. The Center has state-of-the-art facilities for working in electro-acoustic music.  Faculty of the Center for Computer Music led the development of the new interdisciplinary area in Sound Arts that leads to the Master of Fine Arts degree awarded by the School of the Arts.

 
The Sound Arts area is currently accepting applications for Fall 2013. The program is highly selective. Each year only three to four students will be offered admission to the two-year program. Prospective students with a deep engagement with sound as medium, a familiarity with contemporary audio tools and techniques, and a demonstrated use of those tools in different contexts (sculptural or video installations, creation of performance interfaces, circuit-bending productions, innovative fusion of digital audio with digital graphics, imaginative use of network technologies) are encouraged to apply. While the Visual Arts Program in the School of the Arts currently accommodates students working in digital media, sculpture, installation, performance, film and video art, applicants who wish to base their research and studio practice primarily in the area of sonic or sound arts are to apply to the area of Sound Arts. 
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