[linux-audio-user] Re: Gnome Wave Cleaner

Erik Steffl steffl at bigfoot.com
Mon Aug 15 10:13:31 EDT 2005


David Cournapeau wrote:
> On 8/12/05, Paul Davis <paul at linuxaudiosystems.com> wrote:
> 
>>>Yes.  I thought that seemed odd.  Thanks for verifying.
>>>***What's the correct way to un-install them now?***
>>
>>go back into the source code directory you built+installed them from.
>>type:
>>
>>        make uninstall
>>
>>you must not have re-run configure with different options since doing
>>the last make install.
>>
>>note that in the case of the ultimate screw up (e.g. with JACK), you can
>>still use this method. suppose you mistakenly did this:
>>
>>        (unpack source tarball)
>>        cd srcdir
>>        ./configure
>>        make
>>        make install
>>        (remember that you mean to use --prefix=/usr)
>>        ./configure --prefix=/usr
>>        make
>>        make install
>>        (remember that you shouldn't mix tarballs and packages)
>>
>>looks bad now - you have two versions of the software, one under /usr,
>>one under /usr/local.
>>
>>its ok, just do this:
>>
>>        cd srcdir
>>        ./configure
>>        make uninstall
>>        ./configure --prefix
>>        make uninstall
>>
>>and its all cleaned up.
>>
>>--p "no sir, never had to do that, no sir, never, no sir"
> 
> 
> An advice I would add: do not install libraries from source code by
> yourself (ie without your package manager knowing it), because it will
> cause many problems later, if you do not know exactly what you are
> doing.
> 
> If you really want to try some new versions from source, you should
> use something like checkinstall, which builds a rpm or a .deb from
> your sources.
> 
> http://asic-linux.com.mx/~izto/checkinstall/
> 
> The big advantage of this method is that your package manager knows
> about what you installed, and where, thus making the uninstall part a
> non problem.

   the other option is to install into /opt/package-version (using 
./configure --prefix=/opt/package-version), possibly using stow to 
create links in /usr/local, in that case the instwallation is completely 
independent from your packaging system, you can have multiple versions 
installed and control which one is used by either stow or using env 
variables etc.

   (one way or another definitely do not install anything into usualy 
system libs like /usr, /etc etc., pretty much everything except of 
/usr/local, /opt and /home should be handled by package manager)

	erik


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