[linux-audio-user] System Path - Basic Information

Jan Depner eviltwin69 at cableone.net
Sun Jun 5 06:05:54 EDT 2005


On Sun, 2005-06-05 at 04:55, Tom Charles-Edwards wrote:
> 
> > Message date : Jun 03 2005, 10:07 PM
> > From : "Jan Depner" <eviltwin69 at cableone.net>
> > To : tomcharles-edwards at fsmail.net, "A list for linux audio users" <linux-audio-user at music.columbia.edu>
> > Copy to : 
> > Subject : Re: [linux-audio-user] System Path - Basic Information
> > 
> > On Fri, 2005-06-03 at 11:49, Tom Charles-Edwards wrote:
> > > Hi all,
> > > 
> > > newbie alert:
> > > 
> > > I'm looking for some basic info about the system path, e.g. what its for, how it relates to read/write/execute privileges for directories, and tips on what to do/not to do - particularly in terms of installing and running applications.
> > > 
> > 
> >     Not really much to it.  The system PATH is where the system searches
> > for commands.  As far as privileges are concerned you just have to have
> > execute privileges to the executables and directories.  Generally, both
> > directories and executables are 755 (rwxr-xr-x).  Most tar.gz packages
> > will install by default in /usr/local/bin - which is normally in your
> > PATH.
> > 
> > Jan
> > 
> > 
> > 
> 
> <doh>
> 
> Thanks for that.
> 
> If software installs into my home directory instead is that a sign of something horrible happening, or am I OK simply copying the application across to /usr/local/bin and carrying on as normal? I take it putting my home directory in the system path is not the way forward, on security grounds.
> 

    Weird!  I've never seen software install in the home directory
unless you tell it do (via --prefix).  You can copy (or mv) the
application to /usr/local/bin if you want.  If libraries are getting
installed in your home directory they need to be moved to /usr/local/lib
or /usr/lib.

> I was also wondering about editing the system path. From what I can gather from a cursory google the system path can be edited temporarily to affect a specific shell, or  system-wide. The files that I've seen mentioned in this context are:
> 

    You can generally change the PATH by modifying /etc/profile
(assuming you're using the Bourne Again Shell (bash) but it's better to
add a file to /etc/profile.d.  You can add a file called SOMETHING.sh
with lines like:

PATH=$PATH:/home/tom/bin:/usr/local/toms_software
export PATH

This file will be "sourced" when you login and the normal system PATH
will be extended with these directories.  If you're using the C Shell
(csh) you can add a file called SOMETHING.csh.  There are some files in
/etc/profile.d to look at for examples.  To find out which shell you're
using type:

echo $SHELL

Jan




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