[music-dsp] [OT] vinyl? No, thanks...

Andrew Capon andrew.capon at zen.co.uk
Mon Nov 29 10:51:16 EST 2010


Oops, slip of the currency!

$17,000 or $19,000 with keyboard.

Just writing out my Christmas list now, might put it on top and see how it goes :)


On 29 Nov 2010, at 15:27, christian schneider wrote:

> an mv agusta f4 costs as well a significant amont more than a yamaha r1, and both are totally incredible machines. compared to back in time, it's a bargain.
> 
> you have a syntax error, 17k £ are ca. 26.5k $
> 
> c
> 
> 
> 
> On Mon, 29 Nov 2010 13:31:57 +0000, Andrew Capon wrote:
>> http://www.synthtopia.com/content/2009/08/14/the-17000-fairlight-cmi-30a-computer-musical-instrument/
>> 
>> Only £17,000 as well, or with keyboard $19,000.
>> 
>> A bargain!
>> 
>> On 29 Nov 2010, at 13:12, Dave Hoskins wrote:
>> 
>>>> ;)
>>>> 
>>>> Btw, it's not that big of an issue at all. I just wasn't buying 
>>>> that recordings from the days of fairlight are actually 12 bit.
>>>> 
>>>> Sometimes I wonder why I often think that the fairlight and the 
>>>> synclavier were the most intriguing digital systems ever made. But 
>>>> of course, if you need 100k to get an instrument or a at least a 
>>>> big budget to use those machines, probably the rest of your studio 
>>>> is not that bad either. And then, all that was digital was new and 
>>>> wild.
>>>> 
>>>> I buy every release that is worth it on vinyl, if available.
>>>> 
>>>> Vinyl? Yes, please..., with pleasure.
>>>> 
>>>> c
>>>> 
>>>> btw. i would definitely prefer a Fairlight CMI to any actual 
>>>> workstation, but this is an emotional response with a lot of 
>>>> nostalgia in it.
>>> 
>>> Apparently they are re-launching it:-
>>> http://www.fairlightinstruments.com.au/index.html
>>> 
>>> An interesting cut from that site:-
>>> 
>>> "The reason for this is that the CMI's unique sound was the result 
>>> of the limitations of the technology of the eighties.  A-D and D-A 
>>> converters were very primitive by today's standards - the 1979 model 
>>> CMI used eight bit audio, and even the top-notch Series III used 
>>> only 16 bits (which performed more like 14 bits in reality).  The 
>>> variable pitch of the sample playback was generated by very crude 
>>> hardware which approximated the pitch but introduced significant 
>>> artifacts. To compensate for the noise and distortion introduced 
>>> into the samples, we used analogue low-pass tracking filters. The 
>>> "tracking" involved dynamically setting the cuttoff frequency to 
>>> just above the note being played.
>>> The end result was a complex set of colourations which made the CMI 
>>> sound so distinctive.  To make it even more interesting, because of 
>>> the large amount of analogue circuitry involved, the sound of each 
>>> channel was subtly different, and these differences were quite 
>>> variable and unpredictable.
>>> The Fairlight 30A will use the Crystal Core engine to faithfully 
>>> reproduce all these acoustic quirks. Thanks to this use of 
>>> programmable "virtual hardware", each channel will have its own 
>>> "randomness" which gives the combined output the rich analogue CMI 
>>> sound."
>>> 
>>> 
>>> And it had approx. 20,000 components in the thing!
>>> Dave.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> --
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>> 
>> --
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>> reviews, dsp links
>> http://music.columbia.edu/cmc/music-dsp
>> http://music.columbia.edu/mailman/listinfo/music-dsp
> --
> dupswapdrop -- the music-dsp mailing list and website:
> subscription info, FAQ, source code archive, list archive, book reviews, dsp links
> http://music.columbia.edu/cmc/music-dsp
> http://music.columbia.edu/mailman/listinfo/music-dsp



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