Ethnomusicology

Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Caribbean New York (MUSI G9401, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Caribbean New York
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G9401
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Christopher Washburne

Fall 2012 Music G9401
ADVANCED SEMINAR-ETHNOMUSICOLOGY I: CARIBBEAN NEW YORK
Call Number: 76972 Points: 3
Day/Time: T 9:00am-10:50am
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Prof. Christopher Washburne (bio)

NEW SEMINAR: Music, Myth, and Indigeneity (MUSI G6427, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Music, Myth, and Indigeneity
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G6427
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa

Fall 2012 Music G6427
MUSIC, MYTH, AND INDIGENEITY
Call Number: 27797 Points: 3
Day/Time: M 4:10pm-6:00pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Ana Maria Ochoa (bio)

MUSI G6412 Proseminar in Ethnomusicology II: Contemporary Ethnography

Course Information

Course Title: 
Proseminar in Ethnomusicology II: Contemporary Ethnography
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G6412
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Member of the Ethnomusicology Faculty

Music G6412
PROSEMINAR in ETHNOMUSICOLOGY II: Contemporary Ethnography
Section 001  Call Number: 28211 Points: 3
Day/Time: TBA
Location: To be announced
Instructor: TBA


A survey of landmark works of musical/sonic ethnography. Permission of instructor required. Priority given to graduate students in Music.

NEW SEMINAR: Jazz and Film (MUSI G6200, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Jazz and Film
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G6200
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. John Szwed

Fall 2012 Music G6200
JAZZ AND FILM
Section 001 Call Number: 27323 Points: 3
Day/Time: R 4:10pm-6:00pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: John Szwed (bio)

 

NEW COURSE: Music and Place (MUSI G4461, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Music and Place
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G4461
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Ellen Gray

Fall 2012 Music G4461
MUSIC AND PLACE
Section 001 Call Number: 17049 Points: 3
Day/Time: R 12:10pm-2:00pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Ellen Gray (bio)

This course provides an introduction to contemporary work on music and place from an ethnomusicological perspective. It situates ethnomusicological work and specific musical case studies from multiple geographical regions within an interdisciplinary theoretical framework that draws from the fields of cultural anthropology, cultural, media, and sound studies.

Listening and Sound in Cross-Cultural Perspective (MUSI W4430, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Listening and Sound in Cross-Cultural Perspective
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4430
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa

Fall 2012 Music W4430
LISTENING AND SOUND IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE
Section 001 Call Number: 13346 Points: 3
Day/Time: MW 1:10pm-2:25pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa (bio)

The objective of this course is to explore the relationship between listening, sound and music across different cultures and in different historical moments and contexts. This will be explored through recent histories of listening, through anthropological work on hearing and sound in different cultures and through the field of acoustic ecology. The course will seek to compare these three scholarly perspectives and their contributions to a historical and contextual understanding of listening practices.

Meets Global Core Requirements.  Meets CSER major requirements.

MUSI G4401 Field Methods and Techniques in Ethnomusicology

Course Information

Course Title: 
Field Methods and Techniques in Ethnomusicology
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G4401
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Aaron A. Fox (Fall 2013)

Fall 2012 Music G4401
FIELD METHODS & TECHNIQUES in ETHNOMUSICOLOGY
Section 001 Call Number: 84281 Points: 3
Day/Time: TBA
Location: To be announced
Instructor: Prof. Aaron A. Fox (bio)

The goals of this course are practice-oriented. The end result will be short fieldwork-based project of approxiamtely 20 pages in length. In order to complete the paper, students will conduct fieldwork, read and synthesize relevant literatures, and think carefully about the questions in which they are interested and methods of addressing them through ethnographic inquiry.

This course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students.  Permission of the instructor is required.

African American Music (AFAS W3030/MUSI 83030, Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
African-American Music
CU Directory Course Number: 
AFAS W3030 (MUSI 83030 crosslisted)
Points/Credits: 
6
Instructor: 
Prof. Kevin Fellezs

AFAS3030/MUSI83030
AFRICAN-AMERICAN MUSIC
Call Number: 14597 Points: 3
Day/Time: TR 2:40pm-3:55pm Location: To be announced
Instructor: Prof. Kevin Fellezs (bio)

 

What is "black music"? What do we mean when we say we like black music? We'll take a look at four important themes that have shaped what we mean when we say "black music" and may help us understand more deeply why we enjoy it and find it such a powerful reservoir of bodily pleasure, intellectual sophistication, and spiritual sustenance. What draws us to this music? In attempting to answer this question, we will be thinking through a number of keywords such as authenticity, representation, recognition, cultural ownership, appropriation, and origin(s). These concepts have structured the ways in which critics, musicians and audiences have addressed the various social, political and aesthetic contexts in which African American music has been composed (produced), performed (re-produced) and heard (consumed). In exploring the diversity of African American musical expression, we will question our assumptions about race, about music, and the links between the two. By taking a thematic approach, we will see how African American music has both shaped and been shaped by the social contexts in which it is created and performed. Our readings and discussions will encompass African American music from spirituals and work songs to bebop and hip hop, from Duke Ellington to N.W.A., from Bessie Smith to Stevie Wonder, from James Reese Europe to Bob Marley, all of which will help us explore the rich set of meanings black music has held in the Americas for over four hundred years.

 

Asian Humanities: Musics of India and West Asia (AHMM V3321y Fall 2012)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Asian Music Humanities: Musics of India and West Asia
CU Directory Course Number: 
AHMM V3321y
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
TBA

Fall 2012 Asian Humanities: Music V3321/AHMM V3321y
MUSICS OF INDIA & WEST ASIA
Two sections offered:
-- Section 001 Call Number: 65235 Points: 3
Day/Time: MW 6:10pm-7:25pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: TBA
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/subj/AHMM/V3321-20123-001/
https://courseworks.columbia.edu/public/20123AHMM3321V001


-- Section 002 Call Number: 73905 Points: 3
Day/Time: MW 6:10pm-7:25pm
Location: To be announced
Instructor: TBA
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/subj/AHMM/V3321-20123-002/
https://courseworks.columbia.edu/public/20123AHMM3321V002

A topical approach to concepts and practices of music in relation to other arts in the development of South and Asian civilizations. Global Core and fulfills Music Humanities requirements for students in General Studies.

Kligman, Mark

Name: 
Mark L. Kligman
Position: 
Adjunct (Visiting) Professor of Music (Columbia)
Contact Information
Office Address: 
621 Dodge Hall (Music Department Office)
Email Address: 
mkligman@huc.edu

Mark Kligman, Ph.D., is Professor of Jewish Musicology at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in New York where he teaches in the School of Sacred Music.

Educated at New York University and California State University, he earned his doctorate in Musicology with and emphasis on Ethnomusicology at NYU in 1997. Dr. Kligman specializes in the liturgical traditions of Middle Eastern Jewish communities and has published several articles on the liturgy of Syrian Jews. His work also extends to historical trends in the liturgical music of Ashkenazic and Sephardic traditions. Another area of research is contemporary Jewish music since the 1970s.

Prof. Kligman regularly teaches courses on Jewish music for the Department on a visiting basis.

To view Prof. Kligman's full biography page at Hebrew Union College, click here.

 

MUSI V3420 The Social Science of Music

Course Information

Course Title: 
The Social Science of Music
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V3420
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Ellen Gray

Music V3420
THE SOCIAL SCIENCE OF MUSIC
Section 001 Call Number: 19799 Points: 3 
Day/Time: TBA
Location: To be announced
Instructors: Prof. Ellen Gray, Prof. Aaron Fox

Presents a broad perspective on the intellectual history of musical scholarship across many disciplines. Aims to provide music students with an overview of the contemporary enterprise of music scholarship, as well as to understand the history of social scientific inquiry within that enterprise.

All students in this course will conduct independent research projects.  Permission of the instructor is required.

NOTE: This class often fills quickly. Students interested in taking it but unable to register should attend on the first day of classes.  Priority will be given to Music majors/minors/concentrators and Anthropology majors/minors/concentrators, and then by seniority.

Asian American Music (MUSI V3030)

Course Information

Course Title: 
Asian American Music
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V3030
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Ellie Hisama

Spring 2012 Music V3030
ASIAN AMERICAN MUSIC

Examination of the diverse ways in which Asian Americans have understood and shaped their musical prac- tices. We will explore the ways in which Asians have been represented via sound, text, and image, and will consider Asian Americans' participation in composed music traditions, jazz, traditional/folk music, diasporic music, improvised music, and popular musics. The course will reflect on readings from musicology, ethnomu- sicology, and music theory as well as fields outside of music in order to consider Asian American music in relation to critical issues of diaspora, race/ethnicity, gender/sexuality, polyculturalism, and political activism.

MUSI V2021 Music In Contemporary Native America

Course Information

Course Title: 
Music in Contemporary Native America (New for Fall 2012)
CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V2021
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Aaron Fox

2012 Music V2021
MUSIC IN CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICA
Section 001 Call Number: 92748 Points: 3
Day/Time: TR 6:10pm-7:25pm Location: To be announced
Instructor: Prof. Aaron Fox  (bio)

Course Description: This course surveys primarily contemporary scholarly literature and media, including a significant number of readings by Native American authors.  The goal of this course is to present a vitally contemporary perspective on  popular, mass mediated, global, and intertribal Native American (and global indigenous) music/dance practices (rock, country, reggae, hiphop, pow-wow, ceremonial dance, classical, jazz, and more) as continuous with older traditions of musical sociality and meaning and as fully engaged with the present.  We examine the connections between music/dance, identity, politics, and community activism that shape the music/dance idioms and ideologies of contemporary Native American artists and communities dealing with issues of identity, sovereignty, community health, cultural, civil, and human rights, and political expression.  The class will feature numerous guest speakers and artists.

Assignments will include reading responses, a take-home midterm,  2 short papers, and one final project.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW A DRAFT SYLLABUS FOR THIS COURSE (.pdf format, April 2012 version)

Anthony Seeger: Is it Possible to Safeguard Intangible Cultural Heritage, and If it Is, Should We Try? (April 5, 12PM)

Event Date: 
Thu, 04/05/2012 - 12:00pm
Event Location: 
The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Columbia Morningside Campus

The 2012 Ethnomusicology Colloquium presents:

Is it Possible to Safeguard Intangible Cultural Heritage, and If it Is, Should We Try?

A Talk by Prof. Anthony Seeger

Thursday, April, 5, 2012
12:00 pm

The Center for Ethnomusicology
Dodge Hall 701 C
Department of Music
Columbia University

Few musical traditions simply "disappear." Most are actively "disappeared" by intolerance, laws, bureaucratic action/inaction, and changing economic and social processes. Should scholars do anything about this? In 2006, enough member nations had ratified the UNESCO International Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage to enable it to enter into force. This presentation is based on the author's experience with the earlier UNESCO program of the Proclamation of Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity when he served as Secretary General of the International Council for Traditional Music. He will also draw on his own field research as well as discussions of the effectiveness of cultural policies implemented following a given musical form to be a Masterpiece in order to address whether it is possible to safeguard intangible cultural heritage, and if it is, whether we should try.

The New Republic: Columbia Musicians Honor the Legendary Nick Hathaway

The current blog of The New Republic features a story on the legendary songwriter and composer Nick Hathaway, described by his discoverer and Columbia Journalism Professor David Hajdu as "the genre- and taste-defying songsmith known for having the kind of talent that is truly not to be believed."

The blog post is in honor of the first anniversary of Hathaway's death at the piano in Chester, Pennsylvania, on April 1, 2011. It features a riveting video performance of Hathaway's best-loved unheard piece of work: the words and music he wrote for "Man in a Mousetrap," the conceptual production directed in 1953 by the avant-gardist Jeffrey Cordova. Here, in the piece's debut, Theo Bleckmann, the esteemed experimental vocalist, performs "Man in a Mousetrap" at Columbia University, with Jon Weber (pianist and host of the NPR radio series "Piano Jazz Rising Stars"), Chris Washburne (respected trombonist and director of the Jazz Performance Program at Columbia), and the violinist and scholar (and Columbia musicology PhD candidate) Matthew Morrison.  The performance also features a consideration of Hathaway's historical importance by Columbia's Edwin Case Professor of Music, George Lewis, who concludes that "in the history of the American avant-garde, Nick Hathaway stands out as a figure of rare conventionality."

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