Ethnomusicology

Sound: The Sacred,The Secular

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI/CSER G4030
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ana Maria Ochoa

Sound: The Sacred,The Secular  (New Course for Fall 2010)
MUSI G4030
# 93404
Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa

This course explores the significance of sound for understanding the negotiation of the relation between the sacred and the secular, in light of recent work in critical religious studies. It seeks to explore the acoustic dimensions of the 'turn to religion' by exploring the uses of sound in mediating the relationship between the sacred and the secular in different cultures.

Ruth Crawford Seeger: Modernism and Tradition in 20th-c. American Music (New Graduate Course for Fall 2010)

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G8370
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ellie Hisama

Ruth Crawford Seeger: Modernism and Tradition in 20th-c. American Music
(New Graduate Course for Fall 2010)
Course Number:  MUSI G8370
3 Pts.
#41796
Prof. Ellie Hisama


An interdisciplinary exploration of the music and life of composer and folk music advocate Ruth Crawford Seeger (1901-1953). Considers her prescient contributions to modernism and American traditional music through analytical study of her compositions and recent Crawford scholarship.

Music, Gender, and Performance

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V3462
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ellen Gray

Music, Gender and Performance (New Course for Fall 2010)
Course Number: MUSI V3462
#: 72703   
Prof. Ellen Gray


This seminar explores relationships between gender, music and performance from the perspective of ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, critical music studies, feminist and queer theory and performance studies. We examine debates around issues of sex and gender and nature and culture through the lens of musical performance and experience. Some questions we consider include: In what ways is participation in particular music dictated by gendered conventions? What social purpose do these delineations serve? How can we think about the concept of nation via gender and music? How might the gendered performances and the voices of musical celebrities come to represent or officially "speak" for the nation or particular publics? How does music shape our understanding of emotion, our experience of pleasure?

Prof. Chris Washburne and the SYOTOS band at the Kennedy Center


CJWProf. Chris Washburne

and his SYOTOS Band played to a packed house at the Kennedy Center on August 8, 2010. This concert featured percussionist Candido Camero and saxophonist Gene Jefferson. You can watch the webcast at:

http://www.kennedy-center.org/explorer/videos/?id=M4350

Sound: The Sacred, The Secular

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G4030
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ana Maria Ochoa

This course seeks to explore the significance of sound for understanding the negotiation the relation between the sacred and the secular, in light of recent work in critical religious studies. It seeks to explore the acoustic dimensions of the 'turn to religion' by exploring the uses of sound in mediating the relationship between the sacred and the secular in different cultures.

Susser, Peter

Name: 
Peter M. Susser
Position: 
Lecturer in Music
Administrative Roles: 
Director of Undergraduate Musicianship
Contact Information
Office Address: 
808 Dodge Hall
Email Address: 
pms3@columbia.edu

Peter Susser, who joined the Department as Director of Undergraduate Musicianship in 2011, has a long association with Columbia, where he earned his DMA and where he has taught as an adjunct instructor for many years. 

As a composer and producer, Dr. Susser has been commissioned by a variety of orchestras, ensembles and soloists including the Queen's Chamber Band, the Sage City and New Amsterdam Symphonies, and Speculum Musicae. He is on the faculties of Columbia University and the American Musical and Dramatic Academy (AMDA). In 1990, Dr. Susser was a resident of the MacDowell Colony. He received his Doctorate in Music in composition from Columbia University and holds a Master's Degree in cello performance from the Manhattan School of Music, where he won the Pablo Casals Prize and the Ravel Competition. His music is available on Albany and Capstone Records.

Christopher Washburne in NY Times!

Check out the photo and feature on professor Christopher Washburne in the NY Times:

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/12/showcase-159/?scp=1&sq=washburne&st=cse

Ryan Skinner Appointed Assistant Professor at Ohio State University

Ryan Skinner

Congratulations to Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD Ryan Skinner, who has been appointed Assistant Professor of Music and African Studies at Ohio State University.  Prof. Skinner is currently teaching at the American University in Cairo.

Graduate Student Meeting, Wed. May 5

To: All Graduate Students
From: Walter Frisch, Director of Graduate Studies

Meeting with All Music Graduate Students on Wednesday, May 5, 2:15 to 3:30 pm

This will be our spring semester meeting with graduate students and the DGS, and any available faculty, to discuss issues of concern and for us to update you on graduate matters.  All music graduate students are encouraged to attend.  Refreshments will be served!

David Novak Publishes Two Articles

Congratulation to Columbia Ethnomusicology alumnus David Novak, who has just published two new articles:  "Cosmopolitanism, Remediation and the Ghost World of Bollywood," in Cultural Anthropology 25(1):40-72; and "Playing Off Site: The Untranslation of Onkyo," in Asian Music 41(1):36-59.  Dr. Novak is currently a Fellow of the Columbia University Society of Fellows, and will be taking up a position as Assistant Professor of Music at the University of California at Santa Barbara beginning in Fall, 2010. 

Morgan Luker Accepts Position at Reed College

Congratulations to Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD alumnus Morgan Luker, who has accepted a tenure-track position as Assistant Professor of Music at Reed College in Portland, Oregon.  Prof. Luker's work deals with Argentine tango and issues of cultural policy and urban governance.  His dissertation, "The Tango Machine," was completed at Columbia in 2009 under the sponsorship of Prof. Ochoa.

Writing Musical Lives -- John Szwed

Writing Musical Lives
John Szwed
The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall, April 13, 5:30 pm
 
This talk will focus on some of the virtues and problems of writing about the lives of musicians.  It will include a quick
survey of the types and uses of life narratives by ethnomusicologists, folklorists, social scientists, and popular writers, with a short discussion of some recent innovative biographical works.  Examples will be drawn from a variety of biographies, including my books on Sun Ra, Miles Davis, Jelly Roll Morton, and Alan Lomax

Calico Colloquium THIS FRIDAY!

The Spring 2010 Music Colloquium Series, Department of Music, Columbia
University, is proud to present the following speaker:

Joy H. Calico, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, and Vanderbilt University
"Schoenberg's A Survivor from Warsaw behind the Iron Curtain (1958-68)"
Friday March 5th, 4pm
Respondent: Juliet Forshaw
Co-Sponsored by the Center for Ethnomusicology

All Colloquia are in 622 Dodge Hall and are free and open to the public
For further information go to music.columbia.edu/colloquia

Philmore Ensemble Lunchtime Concert

Monday, March 8 11:00-11:50 am
301 Philosophy
A free lecture recital presented by the Philadelphia-based Philmore Ensemble featuring soprano Julia Madden and guitarist Duane Large.  The ensemble will perform early nineteenth-century chamber music including Schubert's Erlkonig

Seventh Annual Columbia Music Scholarship Conference


The seventh annual Columbia Music Scholarship Conference will take place on Saturday, March 6 in 301 Philosophy Hall at Columbia University from 10 AM to 6 PM. Nine graduate students and young scholars will present  original research exploring various facets of the conference theme "Music and Money:  Examining Value in Music." Ethnomusicologist Wayne Marshall (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) will deliver the keynote address "Following the Musical Money Across the Social Web." CMSC would like to thank the Graduate Student Advisory Council, Columbia University Department of Music, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, and the Institute of Latin American Studies for co-sponsorship of this year's conference.

All events are free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided and a reception will follow the keynote address.  For more information about the conference and the schedule of presenters, please visit http://www.columbia.edu/cu/cmsc/. Please direct inquiries to musicandmoney2010@gmail.com.

Female Voices in the Public Sphere -- Amanda Weidman

Amanda Weidman
Female Voices in the Public Sphere:  Playback Singing as Cultural Phenomenon in South India

Location:  The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Tuesday, March 9, 5:30pm
Part of The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University's colloquium series!

Chanting, Mantras, and the Presence of Divinity in Tibetan Buddhist Ritual -- Martin A. Mills

Martin A. Mills
Chanting, Mantras, and the Presence of Divinity in Tibetan Buddhist Ritual

Co-sponsored by the East Asian Languages and Cultures Department
Location: EALAC Lounge Room 403 Kent Hall
Monday, March 1, 5:00pm
Part of The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University's colloquium series!
For more information click here!

Music as Law -- Veit Erlmann

Veit Erlmann
Music as Law: "The Lion King," Intellectual Property, and South African Cultural Heritage

Location:  The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Tuesday, February 2, 5:30pm
Part of The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University's colloquium series!
For more information click here!

The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University is proud to announce this year's colloquium series!


The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University is proud to announce this year's colloquium series!

Veit Erlmann
Music as Law: "The Lion King," Intellectual Property, and South African Cultural Heritage

Location:  The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Tuesday, February 2, 5:30pm

Martin A. Mills
Chanting, Mantras, and the Presence of Divinity in Tibetan Buddhist Ritual

Co-sponsored by the East Asian Languages and Cultures Department
Location: EALAC Lounge Room 403 Kent Hall
Monday, March 1, 5:00pm

Amanda Weidman
Female Voices in the Public Sphere:  Playback Singing as Cultural Phenomenon in South India

Location:  The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Tuesday, March 9, 5:30pm

Kiri Miller
How Musical Is Guitar Hero?

Location:  The Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Tuesday, March 30, 5:30pm

Amanda Minks
Postcolonial Play: Socializing Race and Language on the Carribean Coast of Nicaragua

Featured Undergraduate Courses, SPRING 2010

Click here for full size poster

 

 

 

Click the image to see the full-sized poster.

Featured Undergraduate Courses for Spring 2009-10


Full size poster




Department of Music, Columbia University
Featured Undergraduate Courses for Spring 2009-10
 
(click image to enlarge flyer)

 

Full size poster




Department of Music, Columbia University
Featured Undergraduate Courses for Spring 2009-10
 
(click image to enlarge flyer)


Tyler Bickford Wins Lise Waxler and Panteleoni Prizes

Tyler Bickford's Website

Congratulations to Tyler Bickford, a PhD candidate in ethnomusicology at Columbia, who has just been awarded two prestigious prizes for recent conference papers:

1) The 2009 Lise Waxer Prize from the Popular Music Section of the Society for Ethnomusicology, recognizing the most distinguished student paper in the ethnomusicology of popular music presented at the SEM annual meeting in Wesleyan, CT, October 2008, for his paper entitled: "Media Consumption as Social Organization at a New England Primary School."

and

2) The 2009 Hewitt Pantaleoni Prize from the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Society for Ethnomusicology (MACSEM) for the best student paper presented at the Middle Atlantic SEM Chapter meeting in New York, March 2008, entitled: "The Social Economy of Headphone Use in a New England Primary School."

Learn more about Tyler Bickford's work at his personal website.

Tyler Bickford's Website

Congratulations to Tyler Bickford, a PhD candidate in ethnomusicology at Columbia, who has just been awarded two prestigious prizes for recent conference papers:

1) The 2009 Lise Waxer Prize from the Popular Music Section of the Society for Ethnomusicology, recognizing the most distinguished student paper in the ethnomusicology of popular music presented at the SEM annual meeting in Wesleyan, CT, October 2008, for his paper entitled: "Media Consumption as Social Organization at a New England Primary School."

and

2) The 2009 Hewitt Pantaleoni Prize from the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Society for Ethnomusicology (MACSEM) for the best student paper presented at the Middle Atlantic SEM Chapter meeting in New York, March 2008, entitled: "The Social Economy of Headphone Use in a New England Primary School."

Learn more about Tyler Bickford's work at his personal website.

Prof. George Lewis Wins Music in American Culture Award from AMS

A Power Stronger Than Itself -- George Lewis



We congratulate George Lewis, the Edwin Case Professor of American Music, whose 2008 book A Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM and American Experimental Music (Univ. of Chicago Press) has been awarded the "Music in American Culture" prize for "outstanding scholarship in the music of the United States" by the American Musicological Society, at the AMS 2009 annual meeting in Philadelphia.

A Power Stronger Than Itself was also recently awarded The American Book Award by the Before Columbus Foundation.

 

Center for Ethnomusicology Announces Hopi Music Repatriation Project

Hopi Tribal FlagThe Center for Ethnomusicology

holds copies of, and rights to, the Laura Boulton Collection of Traditional Music, consisting of field recordings of folk and traditional musics made around the world by collector Laura Boulton, from the 1930s through the 1960s.  In 1933 and again in 1940, Boulton recorded a total of 129 Hopi songs, ranging from secular to spiritual genres.  (The 1933 recordings were made at the Chicago Century of Progress Exposition; the 1940 recordings at Hopi.)

Hopi Tribal FlagThe Center for Ethnomusicology

Alaska Repatriation Project Featured on Polar Field Services Website

 Tagiugmiut Dancers, Barrow, June 2008 (photo A. Fox)

The Center for Ethnomusicology's NSF-funded project to repatriate Laura Boulton's 1946 Alaskan Iñupiat recordings, led by Prof. Aaron Fox and Postdoctoral Fellow Chie Sakakibara,  has recently been featured in an article on the Polar Field Services' Notes blog. Read the article here.


Aaron and Chie will be in Alaska from Nov. 20-29.


Syndicate content