Ethnomusicology

Timothy D. Taylor: New Capitalism, Globalization, and the Commodification of Taste (Sept. 29)

Event Date: 
Thu, 09/29/2011 - 12:00pm
Event Location: 
Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
http://ethnocenter.org/contact

Please join us Thursday September 29 for the Center for Ethnomusicology's Fall 2011 Colloquium series, presenting:
 
New Capitalism, Globalization, and the Commodification of Taste

Prof. Timothy D. Taylor (Musicology/Ethnomusicology, UCLA)

Thursday, September 29, 2011
12.00 - 2.00 pm
Center for Ethnomusicology, Dodge Hall, 701 C

Description:

Nora Gamez: "Living in transition: the politics of popular music in contemporary Cuba"

Event Date: 
Thu, 09/22/2011 - 5:00pm
Event Location: 
Casa Hispanica, Columbia University
612 West 116th Street, Room 201, New York, NY

Colloquium announcement:

Nora Gamez

"Living in transition: the politics of popular music in contemporary Cuba"

Ms. Gamez has a MSc. degree in Media and Communication from the London School of Economics and Political Science in the UK.

Presented by CSER, Center for Ethnomusicology and the Department of Latin American Cultures

Location: Casa Hispanica, Columbia University - 612 West 116th Street, Room 201, New York, NY (map)

For further information visit the CSER website.

 

Music and Performance in the African Postcolony (Fall 2011 New Course)

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4435
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Gavin Steingo

New Undergraduate Course for Fall 2011!
MUSIC AND PERFORMANCE IN THE AFRICAN POSTCOLONY
MUSIW4435
Pts. 3
Call #: 26652
Instructor: Gavin Steingo (Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Music)
 

This course examines music and performance in various African contexts, focusing on the postcolonial period. We will explore the complex interactions between music, politics, nation, race, and mediation through case studies from Ghana, Nigeria, DRC, Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Namibia, and South Africa. In addition, we will ask what it means to speak about "African music," and we will theorize the conditions of musical production in the context of postcolonialism.

GENDER/SEXUALITY/MUSIC: THEORY, HISTORY AND CRITICISM

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G8360
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Prof. Ellie Hisama

New Graduate Course for Fall 2011:
GENDER/SEXUALITY/MUSIC: THEORY, HISTORY AND CRITICISM

MUSI G8360
3 pts.
Call #: 95946 
Prof. Ellie Hisama

Exploration of gender and sexuality studies in music theory and historical musicology. Music explored will include classical music, popular music and jazz. Prerequisites: One graduate course in music and permission of the instructor.  

Miles Davis (Grad Seminar)

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G8610
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
John Szwed

Miles Davis
MUSI G8610
#27035
Prof. John Szwed
 

Miles Davis is one of the five or six most important figures in the history of jazz. This course provides a survey of the life and music of Davis, examining the social history and musical traditions that shaped his work, and exploring his influence on music, performance, literature and other arts.

Eighth Annual Columbia Music Scholarship Conference

Event Date: 
Sat, 03/05/2011 - 10:00am

 

The eighth annual Columbia Music Scholarship Conference will take place on Saturday, March 5 in 301 Philosophy Hall at Columbia University from 10 AM to 6 PM. Nine graduate students and young scholars will present  original research exploring various facets of the conference theme "Sound at Play: Music, Humor, and Games." Musicologist Roger Moseley (Cornell University) will deliver the keynote address "Ludomusicality." CMSC would like to thank the Graduate Student Advisory Council, Columbia University Department of Music, and the Center for Ethnomusicology for co-sponsorship of this year's conference.

All events are free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided and a reception will follow the keynote address.  For more information about the conference and the schedule of presenters, please visit http://www.columbia.edu/cu/cmsc/

Composition and Cognition

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G8255
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Alfred Lerdahl

Composition and Cognition

MUSI G8255

#: 97599

Prof. Alfred Lerdahl

This seminar studies contemporary compositional practice from the perspective of the cognitive science of music. Particular reference is made to the instructor's theories. Issues include compositional vs. perceptual grammars; cognitive constraints on compositional systems; perceptual critiques of serialism, spectralism, and other recent compositional methods; the cognitive organization of rhythm, pitch, and timbre. The student develops a major research project, first as class presentation and then as a term paper.

Seminar in Historical Musicology: Music and Biography

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G8108
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Elaine Sisman

Seminar in Historical Musicology: Music and Biography

MUSI G8108

#: 92078

Prof. Elaine Sisman

What constitutes interpretive adequacy in a musical biography? The framing of lives and works says as much about writers as about their subjects. Negotiating the complexities of a representation of career, personality, and music, biographers both construct and are situated in intellectual history. Will the chronological narrative reveal the composer's voice, the musician's gift? In this seminar, we will examine the theory, practice, and limits of biography as well as autobiography. The initial focus will be on composers and musicians of the 18th and early 19th centuries, but topics for seminar reports and papers may be drawn from any period.

Music and Childhood

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G4130
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Susan Boynton

Music and Childhood

MUSI G4130

#: 82152

Prof. Susan Boynton

Thurs 11:10AM-1:00PM

701A Dodge

This seminar addresses the relationship between music and childhood through a focus on the following areas: child musicians, music written for or about children, the role of music in the creation of "childhood" as a modern cultural construct, and the history of musical education, and the shaping of identity through music. We will address a variety of themes using both diachronic and synchronic analysis. Students will pursue research projects in their own areas of interest that may overlap with or compliment the course content.

AJ Johnson Quintet Performance

Event Date: 
Tue, 01/25/2011 - 8:00pm
Event Location: 
University of the Streets (Muhammad Salahuddeen Memorial Jazz Theatre )
130 East 7th Street, NY, NY
Avenue A and 7th Street (SW cor. Tompkins Sq Park)

An infrequent performance by the AJ Johnson quintet will take place on Tuesday, January 25, 2011 at University of the Streets in the East Village. There will be two sets, at 8 and 10 PM. This is the original band from my 2009 CD Songs of Our Fathers featuring all-time greats Victor Lewis (drums) and Onaje Allan Gumbs (piano) along with Salim Washington (tenor sax, flute, and oboe) and Robert Sabin (bass). We will be playing mostly my orginal music.

The performance costs $15 and tickets can be bought in advance at www.universityofthestreets.org. I am hoping to see many of my friends and colleagues there!

Position Announcement: Assistant Professor of Music with a Specialization in African-American Music

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NOTICE:  THIS POSITION HAS BEEN FILLED

 

The Institute for Research in African-American Studies and the Department of Music at Columbia University are pleased to announce the following position:

The Institute for Research in African-American Studies and the Department of Music at Columbia University seek to hire an Assistant Professor with a specialization in African-American Music. The responsibilities of the position include undergraduate and graduate teaching; research and publication; and institutional service. We seek candidates with specializations in musicology, ethnomusicology, or music-centered studies in arts, humanities or social science fields; whose research centers on global Afrodiasporic/circum-Atlantic positions, practices and discourses; and whose teaching and research are informed by critical race/ethnicity theory and postcolonial discourses. Candidates must have earned the doctoral degree by July 1, 2011.  

To learn more or to begin the application process, please visit the following link:

http://academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=54

Review of applications will begin JANUARY 1, 2011.  
(Note correction from earlier posting, which had listed an earlier date.)

Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.

About the Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University

The Center for Ethnomusicology is a unique institution in the discipline and at Columbia University. Founded in 1967 by Professor Willard Rhodes and Professor Nicholas England as "The Center for Studies in Ethnomusicology," the Center was an institutional home to the prominent mid-century music collector Laura Boulton during the late 1960s and early 1970s. A major portion of Boulton's huge collection of field recordings from around the world (but especially strong in Native American and African materials) were purchased from Boulton by Columbia University in 1964. Boulton's collection (recorded between the 1930s and the 1960s) forms the core of the Center's archival holdings.

Advice, Policies, and Application Procedures for Prospective Visiting Scholars and Students

NB: Please note that all requests for Visiting affiliations (scholars or students) must be sent to the Department Chair and relevant Area chair directly, require the approval of a majority of the Department's faculty, and must be initiated at least one semester before (and ideally a full year before) the proposed visiting period begins. The following description of our procedures for accepting Visiting Students and Visiting Scholars is very detailed and specific; but you should read it very carefully before requesting such an affiliation with the Columbia University Department of Music. 
________________________

The Department is often approached by scholars and graduate students from other institutions who have plans to spend time in New York and who are seeking a "visiting" (courtesy) affiliation with us.  We are delighted to host several Visiting Scholars and Students annually, under a variety of program auspices, and many of us have been graciously hosted at sister institutions in the past. Visiting Scholars and Students enhance the life of our community and create new connections for future exchanges.

Fall 2010 New and Featured Courses in Music

Poster

Music Department Featured Courses for Fall 2010.



Click poster to enlarge or download. We have available spaces in all of these classes, so if you're looking for a cool music class for the fall, check some of these offerings out. 

Kielman, Adam

Name: 
Adam Kielman
Position: 
PhD Student in Ethnomusicology

Reed, Trevor

Name: 
Trevor Reed
Position: 
PhD Student in Ethnomusicology
Contact Information
Email Address: 
tgr2109@columbia.edu

Zhang, Amy

Name: 
Amy Zhang

The Politics of Desire in Latin America (New Grad Seminar for Fall 2010)

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G6425
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ana Maria Ochoa

The Politics of Desire in Latin America (New Grad Seminar for Fall 2010)
MUSI G6425
#: 98154
Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa
Thurs. 3:10-5pm
701C Dodge Hall

The course explores the politics of desire through three main contrastive and complementary arenas: the politics of desire as mediated by the state; the politics of desire as mediated by music and, the politics of desire as mediated by literature and film. The course will be simultaneously announced at NYU, CUNY and Columbia, programmed at the same time in all campuses. Four classes will be taught in each of the campuses. All professors are present at all lectures and contribute to all lectures. Students register through their home institution. READING SPANISH IS REQUIRED. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.

"The New Thing": Jazz 1955-1980

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI W4507
Instructor: 
John Szwed

"The New Thing": Jazz 1955-80 (Course for Fall 2010)
MUSIW4507Y
#: 96398
Prof. John Szwed


An examination of the new jazz that emerged shortly after the middle of the 20th century. The seminar will include the work of musicians such as Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry, Anthony Braxton, Carla Bley, Albert Ayler, and the Art Ensemble of Chicago; the economics and politics of the period; parallel developments in other arts; the rise of new performance spaces, recording companies, and collectives; and the accomplishments of the music and the problems it raised for jazz performance and criticism.

Sound: The Sacred,The Secular

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI/CSER G4030
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ana Maria Ochoa

Sound: The Sacred,The Secular  (New Course for Fall 2010)
MUSI G4030
# 93404
Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa

This course explores the significance of sound for understanding the negotiation of the relation between the sacred and the secular, in light of recent work in critical religious studies. It seeks to explore the acoustic dimensions of the 'turn to religion' by exploring the uses of sound in mediating the relationship between the sacred and the secular in different cultures.

Ruth Crawford Seeger: Modernism and Tradition in 20th-c. American Music (New Graduate Course for Fall 2010)

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G8370
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ellie Hisama

Ruth Crawford Seeger: Modernism and Tradition in 20th-c. American Music
(New Graduate Course for Fall 2010)
Course Number:  MUSI G8370
3 Pts.
#41796
Prof. Ellie Hisama


An interdisciplinary exploration of the music and life of composer and folk music advocate Ruth Crawford Seeger (1901-1953). Considers her prescient contributions to modernism and American traditional music through analytical study of her compositions and recent Crawford scholarship.

Music, Gender, and Performance

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI V3462
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ellen Gray

Music, Gender and Performance (New Course for Fall 2010)
Course Number: MUSI V3462
#: 72703   
Prof. Ellen Gray


This seminar explores relationships between gender, music and performance from the perspective of ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, critical music studies, feminist and queer theory and performance studies. We examine debates around issues of sex and gender and nature and culture through the lens of musical performance and experience. Some questions we consider include: In what ways is participation in particular music dictated by gendered conventions? What social purpose do these delineations serve? How can we think about the concept of nation via gender and music? How might the gendered performances and the voices of musical celebrities come to represent or officially "speak" for the nation or particular publics? How does music shape our understanding of emotion, our experience of pleasure?

Prof. Chris Washburne and the SYOTOS band at the Kennedy Center


CJWProf. Chris Washburne

and his SYOTOS Band played to a packed house at the Kennedy Center on August 8, 2010. This concert featured percussionist Candido Camero and saxophonist Gene Jefferson. You can watch the webcast at:

http://www.kennedy-center.org/explorer/videos/?id=M4350

Sound: The Sacred, The Secular

Course Information

CU Directory Course Number: 
MUSI G4030
Points/Credits: 
3
Instructor: 
Ana Maria Ochoa

This course seeks to explore the significance of sound for understanding the negotiation the relation between the sacred and the secular, in light of recent work in critical religious studies. It seeks to explore the acoustic dimensions of the 'turn to religion' by exploring the uses of sound in mediating the relationship between the sacred and the secular in different cultures.

Susser, Peter

Name: 
Peter M. Susser
Position: 
Lecturer in Music
Administrative Roles: 
Director of Undergraduate Musicianship
Contact Information
Office Address: 
808 Dodge Hall
Email Address: 
pms3@columbia.edu

Peter Susser, who joined the Department as Director of Undergraduate Musicianship in 2011, has a long association with Columbia, where he earned his DMA and where he has taught as an adjunct instructor for many years. 

As a composer and producer, Dr. Susser has been commissioned by a variety of orchestras, ensembles and soloists including the Queen's Chamber Band, the Sage City and New Amsterdam Symphonies, and Speculum Musicae. He is on the faculties of Columbia University and the American Musical and Dramatic Academy (AMDA). In 1990, Dr. Susser was a resident of the MacDowell Colony. He received his Doctorate in Music in composition from Columbia University and holds a Master's Degree in cello performance from the Manhattan School of Music, where he won the Pablo Casals Prize and the Ravel Competition. His music is available on Albany and Capstone Records.
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