Institute for the Study of Sexuality and Gender's Spring Theory Salon, a conversation with UCLA's Nina Sun Eidsheim

Thursday, March 31, 2022 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm

Please join us at the Institute for the Study of Sexuality and Gender's spring Theory Salon, a conversation with UCLA's Nina Sun Eidsheim, on Thursday, March 31st from 4:00-5:30 pm.

Professor Eidsheim will be revisiting a chapter from her recent book, The Race of Sound, and presenting a forthcoming chapter for Thinking with an Accent, works that deal with race, gender, and voice.

This event will be held on Zoom, with the link and pre-circulated texts available upon registration. Registration is required.

REGISTER HERE: bit.ly/EidsheimTheorySalonISSG

Texts
"Familiarity as Strangeness: Jimmy Scott and the Question of Black Timbral Masculinity," in The Race of Sound: Listening, Timbre, and Vocality in African American Music (Durham: Duke University Press, 2019):91-113. Available as an open access.

and her forthcoming chapter

“Re-writing Algorithms for Just Recognition: from Digital Aural Redlining to Accent Activism” in Thinking with an Accent, co-edited by Pooja Rangan, Akshya Saxena, Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan, and Pavitra Sundar (UC Press, 2023)

Nina Sun Eidsheim is Professor of Musicology at the University of California, Los Angeles, where her interests include multi-sensoriality, production and perception of vocal timbre, twentieth and twenty-first century music vocal music and opera, critical studies in race and gender, performance studies, sound studies, and voice studies. She is the author of Sensing Sound: Singing and Listening as Vibrational Practice (Duke University Press, 2015) and The Race of Sound: Listening, Timbre, and Vocality in African American Music. She is the Co-editor of the Refiguring American Music book series for Duke University Press and co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Voice Studies. Recently, she founded the UCLA Practice-based Experimental Epistemology, or, PEER Lab, an experimental research Lab dedicated to decolonializing data, methodology, and analysis, in and through multisensory creative practices. In 2022, she'll be on a NEH research fellowship to write a book about the composer and trumpetist Wadada Leo Smith.